Anticipating range shifts in mosquito-borne arboviruses

This study updates known and predicted distributions of Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus, the species most responsible for transmitting arboviruses to humans.

Data resources used via GBIF : 10,000 species occurrences
Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) by Robby Deans via iNaturalist

Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus). Photo CC BY-NC Robby Deans via iNaturalist.

Dengue and chikungunya are mosquito-borne viral infections that have become increasingly widespread public health threats over the past 50 years. Using GBIF-mediated records to remove sampling bias, this study updated known and predicted distributions of Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus, the species most responsible for transmitting arboviruses to humans. By showing that both now inhabit all continents—and may yet have room to expand their ranges further, particularly Ae. albopictus—these findings provide a baseline understanding of the factors in their geographical spread and health-planning measures that might help control it.

Citations

Kraemer MUG, Sinka ME, Duda KA, Mylne A, Shearer FM, Barker CM, Moore CG, Carvalho RG, Coelho GE, Van Bortel W, Hendrickx G, Schaffner F, Elyazar IRF, Teng HJ, Brady OJ, Messina JP, Pigott DM,Scott TW, Smith DL, Wint GRW, Golding N & Hay, S. I. (2015). The global distribution of the arbovirus vectors Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus. eLife 4 e08347. doi:10.7554/eLife.08347

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