Increasing capacity for conservation of threatened fish species through data mobilization and training

There is no datasets associated with this project

lake bunyonyi
Lake Bunyonyi, Uganda. Photo by Rod Waddington licensed under CC BY-SA

Effective conservation planning depends on the existence of reliable data being available on the status and distribution of fisheries resources. In Uganda, the National Fisheries Resources Research Institute (NaFIRRI) houses a vast number of specimens that document spatial and temporal patterns of fish diversity in the country, however, data remains accessible only to institute scientists and exists in formats unsuitable for sharing, effectively resulting in little or no impact in terms of informing conservation policies.

The goal of this project is to increase capacity for conservation of threatened fish species through data mobilization and training. Specifically, the project will mobilize data on at least 10,000 fish records from Uganda’s aquatic systems (including lakes, rivers and streams, and wetlands), while providing training to fish biodiversity scientists in the use of data publishing tools, and creating awareness among policy makers in use of biodiversity information for decision making.

The project team will publish the mobilized data through GBIF.org and UgaBIF, and ensure incorporation into relevant conservation policies in Uganda through close involvement of biodiversity research and management agencies, universities, and policy makers. In the long-term, this project is anticipated to increase capacity for evidence–based conservation, biodiversity research, and education.

Funding
€ 20,000
Co funding
€ 13,641
Type of grant
Small grant
Duration
1 Oct 2017 - 28 Feb 2019
Programme
BID
Project identifier
BID-AF2017-0206-SMA
Funded by
Contact details

Vianny Natugonza; Coordinatiing the implementation of project activities
National Fisheries Resources Research Institute (NaFIRRI)
Nile Crescent Avenue, Plot 39–45 (Opposite the Wagon Ferry Terminal)
Jinja, Uganda

€ 20,000 funded by