BID-AF2015-0117-SMA. Making the zool…

Checklist dataset published by Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe

  • 112

    Species
  • 184

    Taxa
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Summary

Full Title

BID-AF2015-0117-SMA. Making the zoology collection at the Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe accessible through GBIF by end of 2017

Description

Mammalian population numbers have been reducing due to a wide variety of factors i.e. human invasions into protected areas; over utilisation through both legal and illegal hunting, and conversion of habitats. However, historical populations and occurrences of these species has not been readily available and possibly use of the historical information that is locked in the museums has been neglected particularly due lack of knowledge of what resources are there or due to the formats in which they are available (analogue). Therefore, our goal was to make the mammalogy collection at the Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe accessible through GBIF by end of 2017. Availability of this data online would make it easier for individuals, who may not have direct access to the collection to have access. Generally, the mammalogy department has a valuable historic record of mammal biodiversity from locations that are not only from Zimbabwe but also from around the world, predominantly in Southern Africa. These records were not easily available as most were still in analogue format. Therefore, this project aimed to collate and digitize the biodiversity data from the Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe targeting 11 000 specimen records. The overall aim was to produce a checklist which could be used by the public, scientists, and policy makers, so that they integrate information in their research and into policy making processes. The checklist dataset has therefore, been compiled and it includes some of the mammal species records that are found in our main mammalogy storeroom. 11 000 specimen records were digitised. From the 11 000 specimens 122 species and 23 families were generated and this is what our checklist provides. These species range from small-medium sized carnivores, rodents, primates, and bats. Most of them were collected from Southern Africa, i.e. Zimbabwe, Botswana, Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa and Namibia. However, the initial focus was to provide data from protected areas from Zimbabwe, particularly Matopos National Park, however, in going through the collection it proved to be difficult to segregate Zimbabwe from the rest of the countries during the inventory and digitisation. Therefore, we provide information that covers protected areas in the specified countries, though Zimbabwe constitutes 54% of the 11000 dataset and about 400 specimens where from in or around Matopos.

Purpose

The goal was to make the mammalogy collection at the Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe accessible through GBIF by end of 2017. Availability of this data online would make it easier for researchers who may not have direct access to the collection. The overall aim being to increase the use of historical data particularly in conservation policies and frameworks.

Language of Metadata

ENGLISH

Language of Data

ENGLISH

Originator
Tsitsi Maponga
Assistant Curator of Mammalogy
Natural History Museum Corner Park Road and Leopold Takawira Avenue, Centenary Park Bulawayo Zimbabwe 00263-9-250045
Metadata author
Tsitsi Maponga
Assistant curator of Mammalogy
Natural History Museum Corner Park Road and Leopold Takawira Avenue, Centenary Park Bulawayo Zimbabwe 00263-9-250045
Administrative contact
Tsitsi Maponga
Assistant Curator of Mammalogy
Natural History Museum Corner Park Road and Leopold Takawira Avenue, Centenary Park Bulawayo Zimbabwe 00263-9-250045

doi:10.15468/zajsed

Published by

Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe

Publication Date

May 5, 2017

Registration Date

May 5, 2017

Served by

Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe IPT

Alternative Identifiers

External Data

Metadata Documents

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Description

The initial focus was on Zimbabwe particularly Matopos National Park, however, focusing on Zimbabwe alone seem… more

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Other Contacts

Principal investigator
Tsitsi Maponga
Assistant Curator of Mammalogy
Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe Corner Park Road and Leopold Takawira Avenue, Centenary Park Bulawayo Zimbabwe 00263-9-250045
Custodian steward
Moira FitzPatrick
Regional Director
Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe Corner Park Road and Leopold Takawira Avenue, Centenary Park Bulawayo Zimbabwe 00263-9-250045
Administrative contact
Moira FitzPatrick
Regional Director
Natural History Museum Corner Park Road and Leopold Takawira Avenue, Centenary Park Bulawayo Zimbabwe 00263-9-250045
Administrative contact
Kith Mkhwananzi
Curatorial Assistant
Natural History Museum Corner Park Road and Leopold Takawira Avenue, Centenary Park Bulawayo Zimbabwe 00263-9-250045
Principal investigator
Tsitsi Maponga
Content provider
Kith Mkhwananzi
Content provider
Melusi Sibanda
Content provider
Moreblessings Tshuma
Programmer
Farai Musiyandaka
Custodian steward
Moira FitzPatrick

Taxonomic Coverage

The checklist has 122 species from 23 families. These range from small-medium sized carnivores, rodents, primates and bats.

RANK_NOT_SPECIFIED
Anomalurus derbianus (Gray, 1842), Otocyon megalotis (Desmarest, 1822), Canis adustus, Sundevall, 1847, Canis mesomelas Schreber, 1775, Vulpes chama (A. Smith, 1833), Chlorocebus pygerythrus (F. Cuvier, 1821), Cercopithecus mitis Wolf, 1822, Cercopithecus mitis moloneyi Sclater, 1893, Cercopithecus mitis opisthostictus Sclater, 1894, Cercopithecus albogularis (Sykes, 1831), Cercopithecus mitis ssp. erythrarchus, Cercopithecus mitis ssp. francescae Thomas, 1902, Cercopithecus nictitans (Linnaeus, 1766), Cercopithecus ascanius katangae, Lonnberg, 1919 (Linnaeus, 1766), Colobus polykomos sharpei(E.A.W. Zimmermann, 1780), Taphozous mauritianus É. Geoffroy, 1818, Taphozous perforatus É. Geoffroy, 1818, Felis nigripes (Burchell, 1824), Felis silvestris lybica Forster, 1780, Caracal caracal (Schreber, 1776), Leptailurus serval (Schreber, 1776), Otolemur crassicaudatus (É. Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, 1812), Galago moholi A. Smith, 1836, Galagoides granti (Thomas and Wroughton, 1907), Cynictis penicillata (G.[Baron] Cuvier, 1829), Atilax paludinosus (G.[Baron] Cuvier, 1829), Herpestes sanguineus (Rüppell, 1835), Helogale parvula (Sundevall, 1847), Herpestes ichneumon (Linnaeus, 1758), Ichneumia albicauda (G.[Baron] Cuvier, 1829), Rhynchogale melleri (Gray, 1865), Hipposideros commersoni (É. Geoffroy, 1813), Proteles cristata (Sparrman, 1783), Lepus saxatilis F. Cuvier, 1823, Lepus capensis Linnaeus, 1758, Lepus victoriae Thomas, 1893, Pronolagus crassicaudatus (I. Geoffroy, 1832), Pronolagus randensis Jameson, 1907, Pronolagus rupestris (A. Smith, 1834), Miniopterus inflatus Thomas, 1903, Miniopterus schrebesii (Kuhl, 1817), Otomops martiensseni (Matschie, 1897), Tadarida aegyptiaca (É. Geoffroy, 1818), Chaerephon ansorgei (Thomas, 1913), Chaerephon bivittatus (Heuglin, 1861), Chaerephon chapini J.A. Allen, 1917, Tadarida fulminans (Thomas, 1903), Tadarida lobata (Thomas, 1891), Mops midas (Sundevall, 1843), Chaerephon nigeriae Thomas, 1913, Chaerephon pumilus (Cretzschmar, 1826), Tadarida ventralis (Heuglin, 1861), Mus Nannomys minutoides A. Smith, 1834, Mus musculus Linnaeus, 1758, Hydrictis maculicollis (Lichtenstein, 1835), Aonyx capensis (Schinz, 1821), Ictonyx striatus (Perry, 1810), Mellivora capensis (Schreber, 1776), Mustela putorius Linnaeus, 1758, Poecilogale albinucha (Gray, 1864), Nandinia binotata (Gray, 1830), Nycteris grandis Peters, 1865, Nycteris hispida (Schreber, 1775), Nycteris macrotis Dobson, 1876, Nycteris thebaica É. Geoffroy, 1818, Nycteris woodi, K. Andersen, 1914, Pedetes capensis (Forster, 1778), Procavia capensis (Pallas, 1766), Heterohyrax brucei (Gray, 1868), Dendrohyrax arboreus (A. Smith, 1827), Eidolon helvum (Kerr, 1792), Epomophorus crypturus Peters, 1852, Epomops dobsonii (Bocage, 1899), Rousettus angolensis (Bocage, 1898), Rousettus aegyptiacus (E. Geoffroy, 1810), Lissonycteris angolensis goliathi, Sauromys petrophilus (Roberts, 1917), Rhinolophus blasii Peters, 1867, Rhinolophus clivosus Cretzschmar, 1828, Rhinolophus darlingi K. Andersen, 1905, Rhinolophus denti Thomas, 1904, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum (Schreber, 1774), Rhinolophus fumigatus Rüppell, 1842, Rhinolophus hildebrandtii Peters, 1878, Rhinolophus landeri Martin, 1838, Rhinolophus simulator K. Andersen, 1904, Rhinolophus swinnyi Gough, 1908, Paraxerus boehmi, Paraxerus cepapi (A. Smith, 1836), Funisciurus congicus (Kuhl, 1820), Funisciurus isabella (Gray, 1862), Heliosciurus gambianus (Ogilby, 1835), Heliosciurus mutabilis (Peters, 1852), Heliosciurus rufobrachium (Waterhouse, 1842), Xerus inauris (Zimmermann, 1780), Eptesicus hottentotus (A. Smith, 1833), Glauconycteris variegata (Tomes, 1861), Kerivoula argentata Tomes, 1861, Myotis welwitschii (Gray, 1866), Myotis tricolor (Temminck, 1832), Myotis bocagei (Pcten, 1870), Pipistrellus anchietae (Seabra, 1900), Neoromicia capensis (A. Smith, 1829), Pipistrellus kuhlii (Kuhl, 1817), Pipistrellus rueppellii (Fischer, 1829), Pipistrellus rusticus (Tomes, 1861), Nycticeinops schlieffeni (Peters, 1859), Neoromicia somalica (Thomas, 1901), Scotophilus dinganii (A. Smith, 1833), Scotophilus viridis (Peters, 1852), Herpestes sanguineus (Rüppell, 1835), Civettictis civetta (Schreber, 1776), Genetta genetta (Linnaeus, 1758), Genetta tigrina (Schreber, 1776), Epomophorus wahlbergi (Sundevall, 1846), Nandinia binotata (Gray, 1830), Neoromicia nana (Peters, 1852), Palliatus sponsus (Peters, 1852)

Making the zoology collection at the Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe accessible through GBIF by end of 2017

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Study area description

The checklist has 122 species from 23 families that are housed in the Natural History of Museum of Zimbabwe, which is located in Bulawayo (western Region). These species were predominantly collected in Southern Africa. Data included in this checklist was collected from 1901 to early 2000.

Design description

The goal was to make the mammalogy collection at the Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe accessible through GBIF by end of 2017. The data was obtained through inventories from the accession cards on the specimens. This information using accession numbers was then cross referenced with the mammalian form cards and data was entered into excel. The data was then cleaned in excel and open refine, whilst taxonomic checks were done through Catalogue of Life and GBIF name parser, and georeferencing was done predominantly using geolocate. Data was then transferred into specify and then it was then published through the GBIF publishing toolkit.

Funding

This document has been produced with the financial assistance of the European Union, the content of this document are the sole responsibility of the Natural History Museum of Zimbabwe and can under no circumstanced be regarded as reflecting the position of the European Union.

Project Personnel

Principal investigator
Tsitsi Maponga
Content provider
Kith Mkhwananzi
Content provider
Melusi Sibanda
Content provider
Moreblessings Tshuma

Methodology

Collections

Study extent

The checklist includes 11000 specimens that were collected predominantly from Southern African countries, and these countries include Malawi, Botswana, Zambia, Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Zambia. These were collected between 1901 and early 2000. some of the data was collected through exhibitions such as Botswana mammal survey, Matopos mammal surveys and school expiditions which included Peterhouse and Falcon College from Zimbabwe.

Sampling description

Data was collected from specimen labels during an inventory. This was digitised electronically onto excel. Softwares such as Geolocate (localities), Catalogue of life (taxonomy) and Open refine (data cleaning) were used in documenting the data.

Quality control

GBIF name-parser was used to cross check the taxonomy and to rank the species. Data was also cleaned through Open refine. Uncertainties obtained from geolocating an area were also included in the worksheet.

Method Steps

  1. Accession numbers were collected from skins and skulls found in the Mammalogy main storeroom. This was done during an inventory exercise from the period of May 2016 to March 2017. 2. The accessioned specimens were corresponded to the mammal information sheets and registers. These contained information such as sex, morphological measurements, locality, habitat, stomach contents, and general notes. 3. These were then documented into an excel spreadsheet and this was termed the electronic documentation. 4. During electronic documentation, localities were georeferenced using Geolocate and the taxonomy crosschecked through catalogue of life, IUCN, and GBIF name parser. 5. After electronic documentation was completed data was cleaned using excel filters and open refine was also used. 6. The data was then transferred into the specify software. 7. Then the species checklist was generated from the 11000 specimens that had been electronically documented. 8. Registration as a publishing institution was also done via GBIF and data was published.

Collection name

Mammalogy Main Stores Collection

Specimen Preservation method

Dried