Freshwater fishes of Hidalgo state (…

Occurrence dataset published by University of Navarra, Museum of Zoology

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Summary

Full Title

Freshwater fishes of Hidalgo state (Mexico) in the MZNA fish collection of the University of Navarra (Spain)

Description

The state of Hidalgo (Mexico) is an important region from the point of view of biodiversity. However, there exists a significant gap in accessible knowledge about species diversity and distribution, especially regarding to freshwater ecosystems. This dataset comprises the sampling records of two projects developed in Hidalgo between 2007 and 2009 about the freshwater fish communities of Tecocomulco lake and rivers belonging to the Metztitlán Canyon Biosphere Reserve. It contains the taxonomic identity (species level) and basic biometric data (total length and weight) as well as date of collection and coordinates of more than 9000 specimens. This dataset is the primary result of the first and unrepeated exhaustive freshwater fish’s survey of Metztitlán Canyon Biosphere Reserve and Tecocomulco lake. It incorporates seven more species to the regional fish fauna, and new exclusive biometric data of ten species. This dataset can be used by studies dealing with, among other interests, North American freshwater fish diversity (species richness, distribution patterns) and biometric analyses, useful for the management and conservation of these areas. The complete dataset is also provided in Darwin Core Archive format.

Purpose

The ‘Metztitlán Canyon’ (Barranca de Metztitlán) Biosphere Reserve, in the northern part of this state, has a high level of endemism in plants and animals because of its geomorphologic origin (Monks et al., 2005). This dataset is the primary result of the first and unrepeated exhaustive freshwater fish’s survey of this Biosphere Reserve, adding seven more species to the regional fish fauna, and new exclusive biometric data of nine species (Miranda et al., 2009; 2012). Among these species, there are five exotic species. Future Biosphere Reserve’s management plans should consider the presence of these alien species, with the aim to preserve conveniently the biodiversity (Pino-del-Carpio et al., 2011). Lake Tecocomulco is the only remaining natural water body in the basin of Gran Cuenca del Valle de México (Caballero et al., 1999). The occurrences of freshwater fishes present in this lake included in this dataset comprise the first and largest registered population of Chapultepec splitfin Girardinichthys viviparus, a threatened goodeid catalogued as critically endangered by the IUCN (Contreras-Balderas & Almada-Villela, 1996). This species show an extremely reduced range of distribution in the Mexican plateau, only known from a few locations near Distrito Federal (Mexico City), (Navarrete-Salgado et al., 2004; Sedeño-Díaz & López-López, 2009) until this dataset registration. Collection comprises 17 species (and two hybrids) of fishes belonging to eight families of the orders Atheriniformes, Ciprinodontiformes, Ostariophysi and Perciformes. Poeciliidae is the most abundant family, represented by seven species in the HidalgoFFishes dataset, being approximately 50% of the total specimens recorded. This database includes new records for the State of Hidalgo of the channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, two cichlids (Herichthys pantostictus and Amatitlania nigrofasciata), two goodeids (Goodea atripinnis and Girardinichthys viviparus) and three poecilids (Pseudoxiphophorus jonesii, Poeciliopsis gracilis and Xiphophorus helleri). Besides, an undescribed catfish of Ictalurus genus has been included on this database (Miller et al. 2005). Among recorded species, there are one species Critically Endangered (Girardinichthys viviparus) and other vulnerable (Herichthys pantostictus) according to IUCN red list. Knowledge of species occurrences is the first step to manage and conserve the biodiversity and scarce information related to the distribution, abundance and management actions of threatened species hinder the development of adequate conservation strategies (Pino-del-Carpio et al., 2011). This is particularly relevant to conservation of species with restricted distribution ranges and seriously threatened, as the Chapultepec splitfin. The existence of this population could prove to be determinant for the conservation and survival of this species (Miranda et al. 2008).

Additional Information

Zoological Museum of the University of Navarra (MZNA, Pamplona, Spain) was established in the 1980 to curate the scientific research materials of the former Zoology and Ecology and now Environmental Biology department. Its climate-controlled storage facilities hold more than two million specimens, including several type series. The Museum is a Data Provider for the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) and is an Affiliate to the International Comission of Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN). The Museum is also in charge of the curation and management of the Natural History Collections of the School of Science of the University of Navarra (Spain).

Temporal coverages

Date range: Feb 6, 2007 - Nov 21, 2008

Language of Data

 

Administrative contact
David Galicia Paredes Galicia Paredes
Professor
University of Navarra Irunlarrea 1, Pamplona, Navarra ES, 31008 31008 Pamplona Navarra Spain 34948425600
Metadata author
David Galicia Paredes
Professor
University of Navarra Irunlarrea 1 31008 Pamplona Navarra Spain 34948425600
Originator
David Galicia Paredes
Professor
University of Navarra Irunlarrea 1 31008 Pamplona Navarra Spain 34948425600

Published by

University of Navarra, Museum of Zoology

Publication Date

Jan 21, 2015

Registration Date

Nov 25, 2013

Hosted by

GBIF-Spain

Served by

GBIF Spain IPT

External Data

Metadata Documents

7,403 Georeferenced data

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Description

Hidalgo State, East-Central Mexico. Barranca de Metztitlán Biosphere Reserve (20.23–20.75N; 98.95-98.38W) and Lake Tecocomulco (19.83-19.90N; 98.44-98.35W)

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Geographic Coverage

Hidalgo State, East-Central Mexico. Barranca de Metztitlán Biosphere Reserve (20.23–20.75N; 98.95-98.38W) and Lake Tecocomulco (19.83-19.90N; 98.44-98.35W)

Freshwater fishes of Hidalgo state (Mexico)

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Study area description

The state of Hidalgo is located in east central Mexico, at the intersection of the Mexican Neovolcanic Belt, the central highland plateau (Mesa Central) and the Sierra Madre Oriental. Rivers of Hidalgo, part of the Pánuco, Tuxpan and Cazones basins, flow into the Gulf of Mexico. Fishes in the region are relatively diverse and contain Neotropical and Nearctic species, suggesting that this is a transition zone between the two ecozones (Soria-Barreto et al., 1996). The region is characterized by extreme variation in local ecological systems and a high diversity of flora and fauna, produced by geographic isolation of local populations (Pulido-Flores et al., 2005). The Metztitlán Canyon Biosphere Reserve (Hidalgo, Mexico) covers an area of approximately 96000 ha and was designated as a biosphere reserve in 2000. The reserve is situated in the rain shadow of the Sierra Madre Oriental, producing an arid climate and receiving just one quarter of the rainfall of nearby areas located at higher elevations within the Sierra Madre Oriental. Lake Tecocomulco is the only remaining natural water body in the basin of Gran Cuenca del Valle de Mexico. Its surface varies from 7 to 15 km2, depending on the quantity of seasonal rainfall. The lake has turbid and shallow waters, normally with 15-20 m maximum depth, reaching 3 m during some rainy seasons. Sodium, bicarbonates and sulphates are the dominant ions and smaller proportions of calcium, magnesium and chlorine are present (Caballero et al., 1999). Scirpus lacustris L. is the dominant aquatic plant and it extends over much of the central part of the lake. Submerged (Najas spp., Potamogeton spp.) and free floating (Lemna spp.) species are present between the patches of S. lacustris.

Design description

NA

Funding

Project CGL2006-02844/BOS from the Plan Nacional de I+D+I (2004–2007), Dirección General de Investigación, Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Gobierno de España. Regional Development Fund (ERDF), project FOMIXHGO-2005-CO1-1 from CONACYT-FOMIX, Hidalgo, Mexico. Agencia Española de Cooperación Internacional of the Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores y Cooperación, Gobierno de España (A/6357/06).

Project Personnel

Principal investigator
Rafael Miranda Ferreiro

Associated parties

Administrative contact
Angel Chaves Illana
Technician
University of Navarra Irunlarrea 1 31008 Pamplona Navarra Spain 34948425600
Administrative contact
María Imas Lecumberri
Technician
University of Navarra Irunlarrea 1 31008 Pamplona Navarra Spain 34948425600
Administrative contact
Ana Amezcua Martínez
Technician
University of Navarra Irunlarrea 1 31008 Pamplona Navarra Spain 34948425600

Methodology

Study extent

The state of Hidalgo is located in east central Mexico, at the intersection of the Mexican Neovolcanic Belt, the central highland plateau (Mesa Central) and the Sierra Madre Oriental. Rivers of Hidalgo, part of the Pánuco, Tuxpan and Cazones basins, flow into the Gulf of Mexico. The region is characterized by extreme variation in local ecological systems and a high diversity of flora and fauna, produced by geographic isolation of local populations. The study region is part of the Priorities Hydrologic Region of Mexico because the area is impacted by activities of humans and exhibits high levels of biodiversity (Arriaga et al., 2002).

Sampling description

Fourty three localities along the Amajac and Metztitlán rivers and Tecocomulco lake were sampled (Collecting permit SGPA/DGVS/060804/06) using a back-pack electrofishing unit (300-600 V, 0.2-2 A). Fish were anaesthetized with tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222; Sigma Chemical Co., St. Louis, MO) before being sexed, measured (total length, in mm) and weighed (g). Majority of specimens were returned to their habitat. Voucher specimens were euthanized by an overdose of anaesthesia and transported to the laboratory for taxonomic identification and study.

Quality control

Specimens are deposited in the 'Zoological Museum of the University of Navarra' (MZNA, Pamplona, Spain), in the 'Colección de la Universidad del Estado de Hidalgo' (UAEH, Pachuca, Mexico) and in the Texas A&M University, Rosenthal Lab. (A&M, Texas, EEUU). The taxonomic identity of all the species and hybrids was verified in the laboratory by R. Miranda and D. Galicia between 2008-2009 using suitable literature (Hubbs 1924, Hubbs and Turner 1939, Miller 1974, Taylor and Miller 1983, Miller et al. 2005). Scientific names were validated according to W. N. Eschmeyer’s Catalog of Fishes (Eschmeyer 2004). Unique collections’ accession numbers were assigned to each specimen. Other validation procedures, including geographic coordinates format, and congruence between collection and identification dates were checked with DARWIN_TEST (v3.3, Ortega-Maqueda and Pando 2008) software.

Method Steps

  1. Specimens were sampled and processed in the field following the procedure described in the Sampling description section. All the captured specimens where measured, weighted and identified (sex and species) before being released. Some individuals were selected for a deeper study in laboratory and euthanized by an overdose of anaesthesia. Preservation was made directly in the field in 70% ethyl alcohol. Once in the laboratory, all the material was subject of an exhaustive taxonomic revision and field data were corrected accordingly. Project dataset was then incorporated to MZNA database (Zootron v4.5, Ariño 1991), the specimens were then placed in their final containers, consisting on glass jars with 70% ethyl alcohol, labelled properly and deposited in the MZNA museum holdings (except for a subset of individuals that were vouchered elsewhere, see Quality control description section). Dataset was exported to DarwinCore v1.4 format, revised for data inconsistences with DarwinCore standards and corrected if necessary. Once dataset quality was assured, metadata information was added and the derived Darwin Core Archive was incorporated to the Spanish GBIF IPT (http://www.gbif.es:8080/ipt).

Specimen Preservation method

Alcohol

Curational Units

  • 6,453 ± 0 observation
  • 950 ± 0 jar

References

Miranda R, Galicia D, Monks S, Pulido-Flores G (2009) Threatened fishes of the World: Herichthys labridens (Pellegrin, 1903). Environmental Biology of Fishes. 86(3), 377-378. , 10.1007/s10641-009-9528-x

Miranda R, Galicia D, Monks S, Pulido-Flores G. (2009) Weight-length relationships of some native freshwater fishes of Hidalgo State, Mexico. Journal of Applied Ichthyology 25: 620-621. , 10.1111/j.1439-0426.2009.01319.x

Miranda R, Galicia D, Monks S, Pulido-Flores G (2010) First record of Goodea atripinnis (Cyprinodontiformes: Goodeidae) in the state of Hidalgo (Mexico) and some considerations about its taxonomic position. Hidrobiológica 20(2): 185-190. , http://www.scielo.org.mx/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0188-88972010000200009&lng=es&nrm=iso

Miranda R, Galicia D, Monks S, Pulido-Flores G (2012) Diversity of the freshwater fishes in the Biosphere Reserve Barranca de Metztitlán, Hidalgo, Mexico, and recommendations for fish conservation and management. The Southwestern Naturalist 57(3): 285–291. , 10.1894/0038-4909-57.3.285

Miranda R, Galicia D, Pulido-Flores G, Monks S (2008) Análisis poblacional de los peces del Lago Tecocomulco. En: Pulido-Flores G, Monks S, Miranda R, Galicia D (eds.) Estudios científicos en el lago de Tecocomulco, Hidalgo, y zonas aledañas. Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Pachuca (Hidalgo, Mexico). Ciencia al día 8, 51-55.

Agorreta A, Domínguez-Domínguez O, Reina RG, Miranda R, Bermingham E, Doadrio I (2013) Phylogenetic relationships and biogeography of Pseudoxiphophorus (Teleostei: Poeciliidae) based on mitochondrial and nuclear genes. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 66: 80-90. , http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2012.09.010

Culumber ZW, Monks S, Miranda R (2013) Report of Xiphophorus hellerii in the arid Metztitlán Canyon Biosphere Reserve in Mexico. Environmental Biology of Fishes 97, 157-161. , DOI 10.1007/s10641-013-0135-5

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Miranda R, Galicia D, Pulido-Flores G, Monks S (2008) First record of Girardinichthys viviparus, Chapultepec splitfin, in Lake Tecocomulco. Journal of Fish Biology 73, 317–322. , 10.1111/j.1095-8649.2008.01929.x

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