Uses of GBIF in scientific research

Peer-reviewed research citing GBIF as a data source, with at least one author from Poland.
Extracted from the Mendeley GBIF Public Library.

List of publications

  • Jermakowicz E, Wróblewska A, Brzosko E, Mirski P, Hirse T (2015)

    Phylogeographical structure of the boreal-montane orchid Malaxis monophyllos as a result of multi-directional gene flow

    Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 178(1) 138-154.

    We investigated the phylogeographical structure of the boreal-montane orchid Malaxis monophyllos in its Eurasian geographical range. We analysed four sequences of plastid DNA (trnL, trnL–trnF, rps16 and accD-psaI), resulting in 19 haplotypes and revealing a high level of intraspecific diversity (HD = 0.702 and π = 0.196 × 10−2), but showing a lack of phylogeographical structure. This pattern might be caused by multiple phenomena and processes, e.g. broad-fronted recolonization with accompanying multi-directional gene flow between populations and expansion from at least two refugial areas. Despite the lack of phylogeographical structure, three centres of haplotype diversity were indicated in the European part of the range of M. monophyllos. According to these data, alpine and lowland glacial refugia located between the ice sheets in the European Alps and the Scandinavian glaciers seem most likely to be in Europe. Moreover, models of climatically suitable areas during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) confirmed the Alps as a possible refuge, and indicated an opportunity for the persistence of M. monophyllos populations in Beringia and parts of Siberia. Using two models [Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate (MIROC) and Community Climate System Model (CCSM)], we predicted a significant reduction in climatically suitable areas for M. monophyllos in the future (2080). Our study also demonstrated that the biological features of M. monophyllos, including breeding system and dispersal mode, seem to be crucial in understanding its phylogeographical pattern. Our results also highlighted the importance of anthropogenic habitats as reservoirs of genetic diversity and alternative habitats for this species in the context of declining natural populations

    Keywords: Orchidaceae, anthropogenic habitats, cpDNA, plastid DNA diversity centres, species distribution models

  • Wasowicz P, Pauwels M, Pasierbinski A, Przedpelska-Wasowicz E, Babst-Kostecka A, Saumitou-Laprade P et al. (2015)

    Phylogeography of Arabidopsis halleri (Brassicaceae) in mountain regions of Central Europe inferred from cpDNA variation and ecological niche modelling

    PeerJ PrePrints 3.

    The present study aimed to investigate phylogeographical patterns present within A. halleri in Central Europe, to propose hypotheses explaining the emergence of these patterns and to formulate hypotheses on the formation of the present day range of A. halleri in the region. 1281 accessions sampled from 52 populations within the investigated area were used in the study of genetic variation based on chloroplast DNA. Over 500 high quality species occurrence records were used in ecological niche modelling experiments. We evidenced the presence of a clear phylogeographic structure within A. halleri in Central Europe. Our results suggest that the species might have not survived the last glacial maximum in the Carpathians and Sudetes and that its range during the last glacial maximum might have consisted of at least two major parts: (1) a northern refugium consisting of vast refugial areas north and northeast of the Alps and (2) a southern refugium located in the Dinaric Alps and Balkan Mts. We postulate that the Sudetes and Western Carpathians were colonised mainly by plants originating from the northern refugium, whereas populations from the Eastern Carpathians originate from southern refugium. We also discuss our results in relation to the problematic taxonomy of the species

    Keywords: Alps, Arabidopsis halleri, Carpathians, Harz, Quaternary, Sudetes, phylogeography, taxonomy

  • Wieczorek K, Kanturski M, Junkiert , Bugaj-Nawrocka A (2015)

    A comparative morphometric study of the genus Drepanosiphoniella Davatchi, Hille Ris Lambers and Remaudière (Hemiptera: Aphididae: Drepanosiphinae)

    Zoologischer Anzeiger - A Journal of Comparative Zoology 257 39-53.

    The genus Drepanosiphoniella Davatchi, Hille Ris Lambers and Remaudière, 1957 of the subfamily Drepanosiphinae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) is revised using comparative morphology of parthenogenetic and sexual generations. On the basis of thorough examination of morphological characters, a full species status of Drepanosiphoniella fugans Remaudière and Leclant, 1972 stat. rev. is given, and supported by using statistical analysis – principal component analysis (PCA) and multiple discriminant analysis (canonical variates analysis). A new species, Drepanosiphoniella remaudièrei sp. n. Wieczorek, is described and figured in detail on the basis of specimens collected in Morocco. Fundatrix, oviparous female and apterous male of Drepanosiphoniella aceris aceris Davatchi, Hille Ris Lambers and Remaudière, 1957 are described and figured. Original keys to the identification of the known species and morphs of the genus Drepanosiphoniella as well as differences with related species are given. Notes about the distribution and host plants of the studied taxa are supplied. All species studied seem to be montane elements associated with Acer monspessulanum or its subspecies.

    Keywords: Aphids, Insects, Maple, Montane elements, New species, Principal component analysis, Revision, Sexuales

  • Cornwell W, Westoby M, Falster D, FitzJohn R, O'Meara B, Pennell M et al. (2014)

    Functional distinctiveness of major plant lineages

    Journal of Ecology 102(2) 345-356.

    1. Plant traits vary widely across species and underpin differences in ecological strategy. Despite centuries of interest, the contributions of different evolutionary lineages to modern-day functional diversity remain poorly quantified. 2. Expanding data bases of plant traits plus rapidly improving phylogenies enable for the first time a data-driven global picture of plant functional diversity across the major clades of higher plants. We mapped five key traits relevant to metabolism, resource competition and reproductive strategy onto a phylogeny across 48324 vascular plant species world-wide, along with climate and biogeo- graphic data. Using a novel metric, we test whether major plant lineages are functionally distinctive. We then highlight the trait–lineage combinations that are most functionally distinctive within the present-day spread of ecological strategies. 3. For some trait–clade combinations, knowing the clade of a species conveys little information to neo- and palaeo-ecologists. In other trait–clade combinations, the clade identity can be highly reveal- ing, especially informative clade–trait combinations include Proteaceae, which is highly distinctive, representing the global slow extreme of the leaf economic spectrum. Magnoliidae and Rosidae con- tribute large leaf sizes and seed masses and have distinctively warm, wet climatic distributions. 4. Synthesis. This analysis provides a shortlist of the most distinctive trait–lineage combinations along with their geographic and climatic context: a global view of extant functional diversity across the tips of the vascular plant phylogeny.

    Keywords: Kolmogorov–Smirnov Importance index, determinants of plant community diversity and stru, functional traits, geographic and climatic distributions, leaf nitrogen, leaf size, maximum adult height, phylogenetic tree, seed mass, specific leaf area

  • Grech-Baran M, Sykłowska-Baranek K, Pietrosiuk A (2014)

    Biotechnological approaches to enhance salidroside, rosin and its derivatives production in selected Rhodiola spp. in vitro cultures

    Phytochemistry Reviews Forthcoming.

    Rhodiola (Crassulaceae) an arctic-alpine plant, is extensively used in traditional folk medicine in Asian and European countries. A number of investigations have demonstrated that Rhodiola prep- arations exhibit adaptogenic, neuroprotective, anti- tumour, cardioprotective, and anti-depressant effects. The main compounds responsible for these activities are believed to be salidroside, rosin and its derivatives which became the target of biotechnological investi- gations. This review summarizes the results of the diverse biotechnological approaches undertaken to enhance the production of salidroside, rosin and its derivatives in callus, cell suspension and organ in vitro cultures of selected Rhodiola species.

    Keywords: biotransformation, cultures, in vitro, rhodiola spp, rosin derivatives, salidroside

  • Habel J, Mulwa R, Gassert F, Rödder D, Ulrich W, Borghesio L et al. (2014)

    Population signatures of large-scale, long-term disjunction and small-scale, short-term habitat fragmentation in an Afromontane forest bird

    Heredity 113(3) 205-14.

    The Eastern Afromontane cloud forests occur as geographically distinct mountain exclaves. The conditions of these forests range from large to small and from fairly intact to strongly degraded. For this study, we sampled individuals of the forest bird species, the Montane White-eye Zosterops poliogaster from 16 sites and four mountain archipelagos. We analysed 12 polymorphic microsatellites and three phenotypic traits, and calculated Species Distribution Models (SDMs) to project past distributions and predict potential future range shifts under a scenario of climate warming. We found well-supported genetic and morphologic clusters corresponding to the mountain ranges where populations were sampled, with 43% of all alleles being restricted to single mountains. Our data suggest that large-scale and long-term geographic isolation on mountain islands caused genetically and morphologically distinct population clusters in Z. poliogaster. However, major genetic and biometric splits were not correlated to the geographic distances among populations. This heterogeneous pattern can be explained by past climatic shifts, as highlighted by our SDM projections. Anthropogenically fragmented populations showed lower genetic diversity and a lower mean body mass, possibly in response to suboptimal habitat conditions. On the basis of these findings and the results from our SDM analysis we predict further loss of genotypic and phenotypic uniqueness in the wake of climate change, due to the contraction of the species' climatic niche and subsequent decline in population size.

    Keywords: biotransformation, cultures, in vitro, rhodiola spp, rosin derivatives, salidroside

  • Halama M, Poliwoda A, Jasicka-Misiak I, Wieczorek P, Rutkowski R (2014)

    Pholiotina cyanopus, a rare fungus producing psychoactive tryptamines

    Open Life Sciences 10(1).

    Pholiotina cyanopus was collected from wood chips and other woody remnants of undetermined tree species. Its basidiomata were found in June within the area of closed sawmill in the central part of Żywiec city (SW Poland). Description and illustration of Ph. cyanopus based on Polish specimens are provided and its ecology, general distribution and comparison with similar taxa – Pholiotina smithii, Pholiotina sulcatipes, and others are discussed as well. The identity of the active compounds of Ph. cyanopus was additionally determined. Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) data sets were obtained to support the occurrence of psilocybin and its analogues – psilocin, baeocystin, norbaeocystin, and aeruginascin in air-dried basidiomata of the species. The content of psilocybin was found to be high (0.90±0.08% of dry weight), besides, analysed samples contained lower concentrations of psilocin (0.17±0.01%), and baeocystin (0.16±0.01%). Additionally, the chemical analysis revealed small amounts of norbaeocystin (0.053±0.004%) and aeruginascin (0.011±0.0007%) for the first time in the species.

    Keywords: Conocybe cyanopus, Polish mycobiota, aeruginascin, baeocystin, hallucinogenic mushrooms, norbeocystin, psilocin, psilocybin, section Cyanopodae, woodinhabiting fungi

  • Piazza P, Błażewicz-Paszkowycz M, Ghiglione C, Alvaro M, Schnabel K, Schiaparelli S (2014)

    Distributional records of Ross Sea (Antarctica) Tanaidacea from museum samples stored in the collections of the Italian National Antarctic Museum (MNA) and the New Zealand National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA).

    ZooKeys(451) 49-60.

    Here we present distributional records for Tanaidacea specimens collected during several Antarctic expeditions to the Ross Sea: the Italian PNRA expeditions ("V", 1989/1990; "XI", 1995/1996; "XIV", 1998/1999; "XIX", 2003/2004; "XXV", 2009/2010) and the New Zealand historical (New Zealand Oceanographic Institute, NZOI, 1958-1961) and recent ("TAN0402 BIOROSS" voyage, 2004 and "TAN0802 IPY-CAML Oceans Survey 20/20" voyage, 2008) expeditions. Tanaidaceans were obtained from bottom samples collected at depths ranging from 16 to 3543 m by using a variety of sampling gears. On the whole, this contribution reports distributional data for a total of 2953 individuals belonging to 33 genera and 50 species. All vouchers are permanently stored in the Italian National Antarctic Museum collection (MNA), Section of Genoa (Italy) and at the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA Invertebrate Collection), Wellington (New Zealand).

    Keywords: Antarctica, Crustacea, MNA, NIWA, Peracarida, Ross Sea, Tanaidacea

  • Richter D, Matuła J, Pietryka M (2014)

    The Northernmost Populations of Tetraspora Gelatinosa (Chlorophyta) from Spitsbergen

    Polish Polar Research 35(3) 521-538.

    This article describes the morphological characteristics of the populations of green alga, Tetraspora gelatinosa, growing in the stressful Arctic conditions (77°00’22” N, 015°32’54.33” E). We present the first detailed morphological characteristics of this spe-cies from such a high latitude. Populations from both stagnant and flowing waters were studied. Depending on the type of habitat, their mucilaginous colonies (thalli) have differ-ent shapes, but the structure, size and the placement of the vegetative cells, akinetes and ameboid forms, as well as the pseudocilia morphology of both populations, were very simi-lar. Literature data on the distribution of T. gelatinosa indicate that it is a cosmopolitan spe-cies. Our data are compared with some characteristic features of this species growing in dif-ferent geographical and climatic zones. No significant differences were found in the morphology of the colonies compared, nor in the location and the inner structure of cells. How-ever, there were slight differences in cell size between the populations from warm and cold zones.

    Keywords: Arctic, Svalbard, Volvocales, green algae, pseudocilia

  • Sutkowska A, Pasierbiński A, Warzecha T, Mitka J (2014)

    Multiple cryptic refugia of forest grass Bromus benekenii in Europe as revealed by ISSR fingerprinting and species distribution modelling

    Plant Systematics and Evolution 300(6) 1437-1452.

    Despite not having been fully recognized, the cryptic northern refugia of temperate forest vegetation in Central and Western Europe are one of the most important in the Holocene history of the vegetation on the subconti- nent. We have studied a forest grass Bromus benekenii in 39 populations in Central, Western and Southern Europe with the use of PCR-ISSR fingerprinting. The indices of genetic population diversity, multivariate, and Bayesian analyses, supplemented with species distribution modelling have enabled at least three putative cryptic northern refu- gial areas to be recognized: in Western Europe—the Cen- tral and Rhenish Massifs, in Central Europe—the Bohemia–Moravia region and in the Eastern/Western Carpathians. Central Poland is the regional genetic melt- ing-pot where several migratory routes might have met. Southern Poland had a different postglacial history and was under the influence of an Eastern/Western Carpathian cryptic refugium. More forest species should be checked in a west–east gradient in Europe to corroborate the hypoth- esis on the Western European glacial refugia. Electronic

    Keywords: Bayesian analysis, Climate matching, Dispersal, Forest glacial refugia, Genetic structure, LGM climate, Postglacial history, melting pot