Uses of GBIF in scientific research

Peer-reviewed research citing GBIF as a data source, with at least one author from Mexico.
For all researches, please visit our "Peer-reviewed publications" page.

List of publications

  • Arias-Alzate A, González-Maya J, Arroyo-Cabrales J, Martínez-Meyer E (2016)

    Wild Felid Range Shift Due to Climatic Constraints in the Americas: a Bottleneck Explanation for Extinct Felids?

    Journal of Mammalian Evolution 1-12.

    Theoretical and empirical evidence suggests that the ecological niche of species tends to be conservative over evolutionary time in many taxonomic groups, thus representing long-term stable constraints on species geographic distributions. Using an ecological niche modeling approach, we assessed the impact of climatic change on wild felid species potential range shifts over the last 130 K years in the Americas and the potential of such shifts as an extinction driver. We found a significant range shift for most species (both living and extinct) across their distributions driven by large-scale environmental changes. Proportionally, the most drastic range increase for all species occurred in the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM: 18 K years)–Current transition, while for the Last Inter-Glacial (LIG: 130 K years)–LGM transition an important range reduction occurred, which was larger for extinct North American species. In conclusion, the reduction of climatically suitable areas for many species in the transition LIG–LGM may have produced population reductions, which, in turn, may have played an important role in species’ extinction throughout the continent.

    Keywords: Bottlenecks, Ecological niche, Extinction, Felidae, Late Pleistocene, Range shift


  • Bush M, Correa-Metrio A, McMichael C, Sully S, Shadik C, Valencia B et al. (2016)

    A 6900-year history of landscape modification by humans in lowland Amazonia

    Quaternary Science Reviews 141 52-64.

    A sedimentary record from the Peruvian Amazon provided evidence of climate and vegetation change for the last 6900 years. Piston cores collected from the center of Lake Sauce, a 20 m deep lake at 600 m elevation, were 19.7 m in length. The fossil pollen record showed a continuously forested catchment within the period of the record, although substantial changes in forest composition were apparent. Fossil charcoal, found throughout the record, was probably associated with humans setting fires. Two fires, at c. 6700 cal BP and 4270 cal BP, appear to have been stand-replacing events possibly associated with megadroughts. The fire event at 4270 cal BP followed a drought that caused lowered lake levels for several centuries. The successional trajectories of forest recovery following these large fires were prolonged by smaller fire events. Fossil pollen of Zea mays (cultivated maize) provided evidence of agricultural activity at the site since c. 6320 cal BP. About 5150 years ago, the lake deepened and started to deposit laminated sediments. Maize agriculture reached a peak of intensity between c. 3380 and 700 cal BP. Fossil diatom data provided a proxy for lake nutrient status and productivity, both of which peaked during the period of maize cultivation. A marked change in land use was evident after c. 700 cal BP when maize agriculture was apparently abandoned at this site. Iriartea, a hyperdominant of riparian settings in western Amazonia, increased in abundance within the last 1100 years, but declined markedly at c. 1070 cal BP and again between c. 80 and −10 cal BP.

    Keywords: Agriculture, Forest enrichment, Fossil charcoal, Fossil diatoms, Fossil pollen, Human disturbance, Iriartea, Maize, Mauritia, Pre-Columbian


  • Carrillo-Angeles I, Suzán-Azpiri H, Mandujano M, Golubov J, Martínez-Ávalos J (2016)

    Niche breadth and the implications of climate change in the conservation of the genus Astrophytum (Cactaceae)

    Journal of Arid Environments 124 310-317.

    The niche breadth of a species reflects its ability to inhabit different conditions, and to use different resources, hence, species with wider niche are expected to be more resilient to anthropogenic derived climate change. We estimated the niche breadth of all species of the genus Astrophytum from macro-environmental variables and measures of local habitat uses, in order to evaluate whether species having wider niche breadths are less prone to experience unsuitable conditions projected by the A1B and A2 scenarios of the IPCC for 2020 and 2050, and analyzed the implications of projections for the conservation of the genus Astrophytum. Our analysis suggests that most of populations of the four species will experience increasingly unsuitable conditions due to the increase of temperature and reduction in precipitation. The species less affected were those with wider niche breadth and situated in the middle of the latitudinal range and in the middle or lower extreme of the precipitation range for the genus (A. capricorne and A. myriostigma). Although the main threats for Astrophytum species come from the destruction of their habitats and activities as illegal extraction, climate change may reduce the chances for the regeneration of populations and the success of reintroduction programs.

    Keywords: Bioclimatic variables, IPCC scenarios, MaxEnt, Threatened species


  • De La Cruz-Agüero J, Moncayo-Estrada R, Cota-Gómez V, Villalobos-Ortiz H, Valdez-Pelayo A (2016)

    Unusual records of deepwater teleosteans trawled off the western coast of Mexico

    Journal of Fish Biology.

    The first records of three midwater species for the Mexican ichthyofauna (Holtbyrnia laticauda, Brama dussumieri and Cubiceps baxteri), caught off the coast of Baja California, Mexico, in mid 2014, are reported. As far as is known, they are the first verified specimens, geo-referenced and catalogued in a reference fish collection for the west coast of Mexico. The species' known distributions were extended northward in the eastern Pacific Ocean, ranging from 3495 to 8300 km.

    Keywords: Pacific Ocean, extended distribution, midwater fish


  • González-Santos R, Cadena-Íñiguez J, Morales-Flores F, Ruiz-Vera V, Pimentel-López J (2016)

    Prediction of the effects of climate change on Sechium edule (Jacq.) Swartz varietal groups in Mexico

    Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution.

    Climate change has significant impacts on biodiversity and, particularly, on agriculture. In this study, the impact of climate change on five varietal groups of Sechium edule, up to the year 2050, was determined through the application of the HadGEM2-CC model based on bioclimate layers. The varietal groups, nigrum minor, albus dulcis and nigrum xalapensis, will lose more than 50 % of their potential current distribution due to a high impact in both the rcp 45 and the rcp 85 scenarios. These two varietal groups also have a limited distribution, which makes them highly susceptible. In the case of nigrum spinosum, a loss under 50 % is predicted with scenario rcp 45. The varietal group that increases its distribution in 11 % is virens levis. The model forecasts significant impacts up to the year 2050; however, the groups evaluated present high genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity which allow adapting to new conditions that may contribute to mitigating the effects of climate change.

    Keywords: Climate change, Sechium edule, Varietal groups


  • Hernández-Velasco A, Fernández-Rivera-Melo F, Melo-Merino S, Villaseñor-Derbez J (2016)

    Occurrence of Holacanthus clarionensis (Pomacanthidae), Stegastes leucorus, and Stegastes acapulcoensis (Pomacentridae) at Magdalena Bay, B.C.S., Mexico

    Marine Biodiversity Records 9(1) 49.

    Pomacanthids and Pomacentrids are mainly distributed in tropical and subtropical regions, and inhabit shallow rocky and coral reefs. Due to their colorful patterns and unusual body shapes, they have been widely targeted by aquarium fish trade; these species are of great commercial interest. Here we document the occurrence of one Pomacanthid (Holacanthus clarionensis), and two Pomacentrids (Stegastes acapulcoensis, and S. leucorus) north of their reported distribution range during the 2014 warm water period in the eastern Tropical Eastern Pacific. Sightings took place at Magdalena-Almejas Bay complex, located in the western margin of the Baja California Peninsula. Using a series of abiotic data for the Tropical Eastern Pacific, we created a maximum entropy model for each species and identified that high probability of occurrence at Magdalena-Almejas Bay complex was only denoted for S. leucorus. Here we report the occurrence of H. clarionensis, S. acapulcoensis and S. leucorus 70 km, 300 km, and 300 km north of the northernmost reported limits.

    Keywords: Occurrence, Pomacanthidae, Pomacentridae, Reef fish, Zoogeography


  • López-Martínez V, O N, Ramírez-Bustos I, Alia-Tejacal I, Jiménez-García D (2016)

    Current and Potential Distribution of the Cactus Weevil, Cactophagus spinolae (Gyllenhal) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), in Mexico

    The Coleopterists Bulletin 70(2) 327-334.

    Abstract The maximum entropy algorithm (MaxEnt) was used to create a model of the suitable environment for the cactus weevil, Cactophagus spinolae (Gyllenhal) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), in Mexico and to analyze the climatic factors influencing the weevil's potential distribution and possible impacts on another Cactaceae species. Areas located west of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt, south of the Mexican Plateu, east of the Balsas Basin, and northwest of the Sierra Madre del Sur biogeographical provinces were found to be more suitable for the emergence of the cactus weevil. The climatic variables that determine the distribution of C. spinolae were seasonal temperatures (24.5%) and precipitation of coldest quarter (24.0%). The commercial production areas of edible Opuntia Mill. (prickly pear cactus and barbary fig) and pitahaya in Central Mexico match with the environmental suitability calculated for the cactus weevil.

    Keywords: MaxEnt, biogeographical provinces, distribution, ecological niche modelling, prickly pear cactus pear


  • López-Martínez V, Sánchez-Martínez G, Jiménez-García D, Pérez-De la O N, Coleman T (2016)

    Environmental suitability for Agrilus auroguttatus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Mexico using MaxEnt and database records of four Quercus (Fagaceae) species

    Agricultural and Forest Entomology.

    The goldspotted oak borer Agrilus auroguttatus Schaeffer is an invasive pest of three Quercus species in southern California, U.S.A. As a native and potentially indigenous exotic species, its distribution and potential damage is largely unknown in Mexico. We used the maximum entropy algorithm to determine the bioclimatic variables that may explain the distribution of A. auroguttatus, as well as its interaction with the distribution of known hosts in Mexico. Our model calculated high suitability for A. auroguttatus in the biogeographical provinces of California, the northern and southern areas of Sierra Madre Occidental and the northwestern area of the Mexican Plateau; moderate suitability was projected in the Baja California, Sonora and Sierra Madre Occidental provinces. Potential distribution of A. auroguttatus was overlapping with native ranges of Quercus agrifolia, Quercus emoryi Torrey and Quercus hypoleucoides A. Camus. Precipitation of the coldest quarter (23.6%), isothermality (23.5%), precipitation seasonality (17.3%) and mean temperature of the coldest quarter (11.2%) contributed most to explaining its distribution in Mexico. The geographical interaction (i.e. the likelihood that the habitat would be suitable for coexistence) of A. auroguttatus with its hosts in Mexico was projected in the California province (46 382.60 km2, probably as an exotic species) and the northwestern areas of Mexican Plateau and Sierra Madre Occidental provinces (74 013.45 km2, probably as native). Determining the areas of environmental suitability for A. auroguttatus and its host distribution can focus ground surveys, contribute to management efforts and assist in the development of risk assessments for Mexico.

    Keywords: Ecological niche, Mexican, biogeographical provinces, exotic wood borer, goldspotted oak borer


  • López-Martínez V, Sánchez-Martínez G, Jiménez-García D, Pérez-De la O N, Coleman T (2016)

    Environmental suitability for Agrilus auroguttatus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Mexico using MaxEnt and database records of four Quercus (Fagaceae) species

    Agricultural and Forest Entomology.

    The goldspotted oak borer Agrilus auroguttatus Schaeffer is an invasive pest of three Quercus species in southern California, U.S.A. As a native and potentially indigenous exotic species, its distribution and potential damage is largely unknown in Mexico. We used the maximum entropy algorithm to determine the bioclimatic variables that may explain the distribution of A. auroguttatus, as well as its interaction with the distribution of known hosts in Mexico. Our model calculated high suitability for A. auroguttatus in the biogeographical provinces of California, the northern and southern areas of Sierra Madre Occidental and the northwestern area of the Mexican Plateau; moderate suitability was projected in the Baja California, Sonora and Sierra Madre Occidental provinces. Potential distribution of A. auroguttatus was overlapping with native ranges of Quercus agrifolia, Quercus emoryi Torrey and Quercus hypoleucoides A. Camus. Precipitation of the coldest quarter (23.6%), isothermality (23.5%), precipitation seasonality (17.3%) and mean temperature of the coldest quarter (11.2%) contributed most to explaining its distribution in Mexico. The geographical interaction (i.e. the likelihood that the habitat would be suitable for coexistence) of A. auroguttatus with its hosts in Mexico was projected in the California province (46 382.60 km2, probably as an exotic species) and the northwestern areas of Mexican Plateau and Sierra Madre Occidental provinces (74 013.45 km2, probably as native). Determining the areas of environmental suitability for A. auroguttatus and its host distribution can focus ground surveys, contribute to management efforts and assist in the development of risk assessments for Mexico.

    Keywords: Ecological niche, Mexican, biogeographical provinces, exotic wood borer, goldspotted oak borer


  • Martin G, Yanez-Arenas C, Roberts B, Chen C, Plowright R, Webb R et al. (2016)

    Climatic suitability influences species specific abundance patterns of Australian flying foxes and risk of Hendra virus spillover

    One Health 2 115-121.

    Hendra virus is a paramyxovirus of Australian flying fox bats. It was first detected in August 1994, after the death of 20 horses and one human. Since then it has occurred regularly within a portion of the geographical distribution of all Australian flying fox (fruit bat) species. There is, however, little understanding about which species are most likely responsible for spillover, or why spillover does not occur in other areas occupied by reservoir and spillover hosts. Using ecological niche models of the four flying fox species we were able to identify which species are most likely linked to spillover events using the concept of distance to the niche centroid of each species. With this novel approach we found that 20 out of 27 events occur disproportionately closer to the niche centroid of two species (P. alecto and P. conspicillatus). With linear regressions we found a negative relationship between distance to the niche centroid and abundance of these two species. Thus, we suggest that the bioclimatic niche of these two species is likely driving the spatial pattern of spillover of Hendra virus into horses and ultimately humans.

    Keywords: Density, Flying foxes, Hendra virus, Niche centroid, Spillover