Uses of GBIF in scientific research

Peer-reviewed research citing GBIF as a data source, with at least one author from France.
For all researches, please visit our "Peer-reviewed publications" page.

List of publications

  • Ambrósio Moreira P, Mariac C, Zekraoui L, Couderc M, Rodrigues D, Clement C et al. (2017)

    Human management and hybridization shape treegourd fruits in the Brazilian Amazon Basin

    Evolutionary Applications.

    Local people's perceptions of cultivated and wild agrobiodiversity, as well as their management of hybridization are still understudied in Amazonia. Here we analyze domesticated treegourd (Crescentia cujete), whose versatile fruits have technological, symbolic and medicinal uses. A wild relative (C. amazonica) of the cultivated species grows spontaneously in Amazonian flooded forests. We demonstrated, using whole chloroplast sequences and nuclear microsatellites, that the two species are strongly differentiated. Nonetheless, they hybridize readily throughout Amazonia and the proportions of admixture correlate with fruit size variation of cultivated trees. New morphotypes arise from hybridization, and are recognized by people and named as local varieties. Small hybrid fruits are used to make the important symbolic rattle (maracá), suggesting that management of hybrid trees is an ancient human practice in Amazonia. Effective conservation of Amazonian agrobiodiversity needs to incorporate this interaction between wild and cultivated populations that is managed by smallholder families. Beyond treegourd, our study clearly shows that hybridization plays an important role in tree crop phenotypic diversification, and that the integration of molecular analyses and farmers'perceptions of diversity help disentangle crop domestication history.

    Keywords: Crescentia amazonica, Crescentia cujete, agrobiodiversity, introgression, plant domestication, wetlands


  • Faulkner K, Robertson M, Rouget M, Wilson J (2017)

    Prioritising surveillance for alien organisms transported as stowaways on ships travelling to South Africa

    PLOS ONE 12(4) e0173340.

    The global shipping network facilitates the transportation and introduction of marine and terrestrial organisms to regions where they are not native, and some of these organisms become invasive. South Africa was used as a case study to evaluate the potential for shipping to contribute to the introduction and establishment of marine and terrestrial alien species (i.e. establishment debt) and to assess how this varies across shipping routes and seasons. As a proxy for the number of species introduced (i.e. ‘colonisation pressure’) shipping movement data were used to determine, for each season, the number of ships that visited South African ports from foreign ports and the number of days travelled between ports. Seasonal marine and terrestrial environmental similarity between South African and foreign ports was then used to estimate the likelihood that introduced species would establish. These data were used to determine the seasonal relative contribution of shipping routes to South Africa’s marine and terrestrial establishment debt. Additionally, distribution data were used to identify marine and terrestrial species that are known to be invasive elsewhere and which might be introduced to each South African port through shipping routes that have a high relative contribution to establishment debt. Shipping routes from Asian ports, especially Singapore, have a particularly high relative contribution to South Africa’s establishment debt, while among South African ports, Durban has the highest risk of being invaded. There was seasonal variation in the shipping routes that have a high relative contribution to the establishment debt of the South African ports. The presented method provides a simple way to prioritise surveillance effort and our results indicate that, for South Africa, port-specific prevention strategies should be developed, a large portion of the available resources should be allocated to Durban, and seasonal variations and their consequences for prevention strategies should be explored further.

    Keywords: Crescentia amazonica, Crescentia cujete, agrobiodiversity, introgression, plant domestication, wetlands


  • Gillard M, Thiébaut G, Deleu C, Leroy B (2017)

    Present and future distribution of three aquatic plants taxa across the world: decrease in native and increase in invasive ranges

    Biological Invasions 1-12.

    Inland aquatic ecosystems are vulnerable to both climate change and biological invasion at broad spatial scales. The aim of this study was to establish the current and future potential distribution of three invasive plant taxa, Egeria densa, Myriophyllum aquaticum and Ludwigia spp., in their native and exotic ranges. We used species distribution models (SDMs), with nine different algorithms and three global circulation models, and we restricted the suitability maps to cells containing aquatic ecosystems. The current bioclimatic range of the taxa was predicted to represent 6.6–12.3% of their suitable habitats at global scale, with a lot of variations between continents. In Europe and North America, their invasive ranges are predicted to increase up to two fold by 2070 with the highest gas emission scenario. Suitable new areas will mainly be located to the north of their current range. In other continents where they are exotic and in their native range (South America), the surface areas of suitable locations are predicted to decrease with climate change, especially for Ludwigia spp. in South America (down to −55% by 2070 with RCP 8.5 scenario). This study allows to identify areas vulnerable to ongoing invasions by aquatic plant species and thus could help the prioritisation of monitoring and management, as well as contribute to the public awareness regarding biological invasions.

    Keywords: Brazilian waterweed, Climate change, Parrot feather, RCP scenarios, Species distribution models, Water primroses


  • Grossenbacher D, Brandvain Y, Auld J, Burd M, Cheptou P, Conner J et al. (2017)

    Self-compatibility is over-represented on islands

    New Phytologist.

    Because establishing a new population often depends critically on finding mates, individuals capable of uniparental reproduction may have a colonization advantage. Accordingly, there should be an over-representation of colonizing species in which individuals can reproduce without a mate, particularly in isolated locales such as oceanic islands. Despite the intuitive appeal of this colonization filter hypothesis (known as Baker's law), more than six decades of analyses have yielded mixed findings. We assembled a dataset of island and mainland plant breeding systems, focusing on the presence or absence of self-incompatibility. Because this trait enforces outcrossing and is unlikely to re-evolve on short timescales if it is lost, breeding system is especially likely to reflect the colonization filter. We found significantly more self-compatible species on islands than mainlands across a sample of > 1500 species from three widely distributed flowering plant families (Asteraceae, Brassicaceae and Solanaceae). Overall, 66% of island species were self-compatible, compared with 41% of mainland species. Our results demonstrate that the presence or absence of self-incompatibility has strong explanatory power for plant geographical patterns. Island floras around the world thus reflect the role of a key reproductive trait in filtering potential colonizing species in these three plant families.

    Keywords: Baker's law, biogeography, ecological filtering, island, mainland, self‐incompatibility


  • Larter M, Pfautsch S, Domec J, Trueba S, Nagalingum N, Delzon S (2017)

    Aridity drove the evolution of extreme embolism resistance and the radiation of conifer genus Callitris

    New Phytologist.

    Xylem vulnerability to embolism is emerging as a major factor in drought-induced tree mortality events across the globe. However, we lack understanding of how and to what extent climate has shaped vascular properties or functions. We investigated the evolution of xylem hydraulic function and diversification patterns in Australia's most successful gymnosperm clade, Callitris, the world's most drought-resistant conifers. For all 23 species in this group, we measured embolism resistance (P50), xylem specific hydraulic conductivity (Ks), wood density, and tracheary element size from natural populations. We investigated whether hydraulic traits variation linked with climate and the diversification of this clade using a time-calibrated phylogeny. Embolism resistance varied widely across the Callitris clade (P50: −3.8 to −18.8 MPa), and was significantly related to water scarcity, as was tracheid diameter. We found no evidence of a safety-efficiency tradeoff; Ks and wood density were not related to rainfall. Callitris diversification coincides with the onset of aridity in Australia since the early Oligocene. Our results highlight the evolutionary lability of xylem traits with climate, and the leading role of aridity in the diversification of conifers. The uncoupling of safety from other xylem functions allowed Callitris to evolve extreme embolism resistance and diversify into xeric environments.

    Keywords: climate change, diversification, drought, ecophysiology, embolism resistance, evolution, gymnosperms, xylem


  • Maquart P, Noort S (2017)

    Description of a new species of Capederces (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Cerambycinae) from South Africa

    Zootaxa 4244(4) 583.

    A new species of longhorned beetle in the tribe Tillomorphini, Capederces madibai sp. nov., is described from the “Albany district” in south-eastern South Africa. Adult specimens are illustrated and compared with the only other known species from this previously mono-specific genus: C. hauseri Adlbauer, 2001. An illustration of the female of C. hauseri is provided for the first time.

    Keywords: Biodiversity, Coleoptera, Ethiopian region, Taxonomy, Tillomorphini


  • Moreau C, Saucède T, Jossart Q, Agüera A, Brayard A, Danis B (2017)

    Reproductive strategy as a piece of the biogeographic puzzle: a case study using Antarctic sea stars (Echinodermata, Asteroidea)

    Journal of Biogeography.

    Aim To describe and analyse asteroid biogeographic patterns in the Southern Ocean (SO) and test whether reproductive strategy (brooder versus broadcaster) can explain distribution patterns at the scale of the entire class. We hypothesize that brooding and broadcasting species display different biogeographic patterns. Location Southern Ocean, south of 45 °S. Methods Over 14,000 asteroid occurrences are analysed using bootstrapped spanning network (BSN), non-metrical multidimensional scaling (nMDS) and clustering to uncover the spatial structure of faunal similarities among 25 bioregions. Results Main biogeographic patterns are congruent with previous works based on other taxa and highlight the isolation of New Zealand, the high richness in the Scotia Arc area particularly of brooding species, an East/West Antarctic differentiation, and the faunal affinities between South America and sub-Antarctic Islands. Asteroids show lower endemism levels than previously reported with 29% of species occurring in Antarctica only. In particular, asteroids from Tierra del Fuego showed affinities with those of West Antarctica at the species level, suggesting a recent mixing of assemblages. Biogeographic patterns are highly linked to reproductive strategy. Patterns also differ according to the taxonomic level, revealing the underlying role of historical factors. Main conclusions Patterns of sea star biogeography are consistent with results obtained for other marine groups and are strongly linked to reproductive strategy.

    Keywords: Biodiversity, Coleoptera, Ethiopian region, Taxonomy, Tillomorphini


  • Odonne G, Houël E, Bourdy G, Stien D (2017)

    Healing leishmaniasis in Amazonia: review of ethnomedicinal concepts and pharmaco-chemical analysis of traditional treatments to inspire modern phytotherapies

    Journal of Ethnopharmacology.

    ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE Cutaneous/mucocutaneous leishmaniasis are neglected tropical diseases occurring in all intertropical regions of the world. Amazonian populations developed an abundant knowledge related to the disease and its remedies. Therefore, we undertook to review traditional antileishmanial plants in Amazonia, and developed new tools to analyze this somewhat dispersed information. MATERIAL AND METHODS A review of the literature concerning traditional remedies against cutaneous/mucocutaneous leishmaniasis in the Amazon was conducted, and the obtained data used for the calculation of distribution indexes designed to highlight the most relevant uses in Amazonia. The cultural distribution index represents the distribution rate of a given taxon among different cultural groups and was calculated as the ratio of the number of groups using the taxon to the total number of groups cited. The geographical distribution index allowed us to quantify spatial distribution of a taxon's uses in Amazonia and was calculated geometrically by measuring the average distance between the points where uses have been reported and the barycenter of those points. The general distribution index was defined as an arithmetic combination of the previous two, and gives information on both cultural and spatial criteria. RESULTS 475 use reports, concerning 291 botanical species belonging to 83 families, have been depicted from 29 sources. The uses concern 34 cultural groups. While the use of some taxa appears to be Pan-Amazonian, some others are clearly restricted to small geographical regions. Particular attention has been paid to the recipes and beliefs surroundings the treatments. Topical application of the remedies dominated the other means of administration, which deserves particular attention as the main treatments against Neotropical leishmaniasis are painful systemic injections. The data set was analyzed using the previously defined distribution indexes, and the most relevant taxa were further discussed from a phytochemical and pharmacological point of view. CONCLUSIONS The Amazonian biodiversity and cultural heritage host a fantastic amount of data whose systematic investigation should allow a better large-scale understanding of traditional therapies’ dynamic and the consequent discovery of therapeutic solutions for neglected diseases. Distribution indexes are indeed powerful tools for emphasizing the most relevant treatments against a given disease and should be very useful in the meta-analysis of other regional pharmacopeia. Eventually, this focus on renowned remedies which do however not yet benefit from extended laboratory studies could stimulate future research for new treatments from natural origin against leishmaniasis.

    Keywords: Ethnomedecine, distribution indices, interculturality, medicinal plants


  • Odonne G, Houël E, Bourdy G, Stien D (2017)

    Treating leishmaniasis in Amazonia: A review of ethnomedicinal concepts and pharmaco-chemical analysis of traditional treatments to inspire modern phytotherapies

    Journal of Ethnopharmacology 199 211-230.

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis are neglected tropical diseases that occur in all intertropical regions of the world. Amazonian populations have developed an abundant knowledge of the disease and its remedies. Therefore, we undertook to review traditional antileishmanial plants in Amazonia and have developed new tools to analyze this somewhat dispersed information. Material and methods A literature review of traditional remedies for cutaneous/mucocutaneous leishmaniasis in the Amazon was conducted and the data obtained was used to calculate distribution indexes designed to highlight the most relevant uses in Amazonia. The cultural distribution index represents the distribution rate of a given taxon among different cultural groups and was calculated as the ratio of the number of groups using the taxon to the total number of groups cited. The geographical distribution index allowed us to quantify spatial distribution of a taxon’s uses in Amazonia and was calculated geometrically by measuring the average distance between the points where uses have been reported and the barycenter of those points. The general distribution index was defined as an arithmetic combination of the previous two and provides information on both cultural and spatial criteria. Results 475 use reports, concerning 291 botanical species belonging to 83 families have been gathered depicted from 29 sources. Uses concern 34 cultural groups. While the use of some taxa appears to be Pan-Amazonian, some others are clearly restricted to small geographical regions. Particular attention has been paid to the recipes and beliefs surrounding treatments. Topical application of the remedies dominated the other means of administration and this deserves particular attention as the main treatments against Neotropical leishmaniasis are painful systemic injections. The data set was analyzed using the previously defined distribution indexes and the most relevant taxa were further discussed from a phytochemical and pharmacological point of view. Conclusions The Amazonian biodiversity and cultural heritage host a fantastic amount of data whose systematic investigation should allow a better large-scale understanding of the dynamics of traditional therapies and the consequent discovery of therapeutic solutions for neglected diseases. Distribution indices are indeed powerful tools for emphasizing the most relevant treatments against a given disease and should be very useful in the meta-analysis of other regional pharmacopeia. This focus on renowned remedies that have not yet benefitted from extended laboratory studies, could stimulate future research on new treatments of natural origin for leishmaniasis.

    Keywords: Amazonia, Distribution indexes, Ethnomedecine, Interculturality, Leishmaniasis, Medicinal plants, Traditional medicine


  • Rocchini D, Garzon-Lopez C, Marcantonio M, Amici V, Bacaro G, Bastin L et al. (2017)

    Anticipating species distributions: Handling sampling effort bias under a Bayesian framework

    Science of The Total Environment.

    Keywords: Anticipation, Bayesian theorem, Species distribution modeling, Uncertainty, sampling effort bias