Uses of GBIF in scientific research

Peer-reviewed research citing GBIF as a data source, with at least one author from Germany.
Extracted from the Mendeley GBIF Public Library.

List of publications

  • Adriaens, T., Sutton-Croft, M., Owen, K., Brosens, D., van Valkenburg, J., Kilbey, D., Groom, Q., Ehmig, C., Thürkow, F. V, , P., Schneider K (2015)

    Trying to engage the crowd in recording invasive alien species in Europe: experiences from two smartphone applications in northwest Europe

    Management of Biological Invasions 6(2) 215-225.

    New technologies such as smartphone appli cation software (apps) are increasingly used to reach a wider audience on the subject of invasive alien species (IAS) and to involve the public in recording them. In this paper we pr esent two of the more recent smartphone app lications for IAS recording in northwest Europe, the RINSE That’s Invasive! app and the KORINA app. We present an overview of available smartphone apps for IAS recording in Europe and addr ess issues of data integra tion, data openness, data quality, data harmonisation and da tabase interoperability. Finally, we make some recommendations for future app design

    Keywords: biological recording, citizen science, early war

  • Alter S, Meyer M, Post K, Czechowski P, Gravlund P, Gaines C et al. (2015)

    Climate impacts on transocean dispersal and habitat in gray whales from the Pleistocene to 2100.

    Molecular ecology 24(7) 1510-22.

    Arctic animals face dramatic habitat alteration due to ongoing climate change. Understanding how such species have responded to past glacial cycles can help us forecast their response to today's changing climate. Gray whales are among those marine species likely to be strongly affected by Arctic climate change, but a thorough analysis of past climate impacts on this species has been complicated by lack of information about an extinct population in the Atlantic. While little is known about the history of Atlantic gray whales or their relationship to the extant Pacific population, the extirpation of the Atlantic population during historical times has been attributed to whaling. We used a combination of ancient and modern DNA, radiocarbon dating and predictive habitat modelling to better understand the distribution of gray whales during the Pleistocene and Holocene. Our results reveal that dispersal between the Pacific and Atlantic was climate dependent and occurred both during the Pleistocene prior to the last glacial period and the early Holocene immediately following the opening of the Bering Strait. Genetic diversity in the Atlantic declined over an extended interval that predates the period of intensive commercial whaling, indicating this decline may have been precipitated by Holocene climate or other ecological causes. These first genetic data for Atlantic gray whales, particularly when combined with predictive habitat models for the year 2100, suggest that two recent sightings of gray whales in the Atlantic may represent the beginning of the expansion of this species' habitat beyond its currently realized range.

    Keywords: Animals, Arctic Regions, Atlantic Ocean, Biological, Climate Change, DNA, Ecosystem, Fossils, Genetic Variation, Haplotypes, Mitochondrial, Mitochondrial: genetics, Models, Molecular Sequence Data, Phylogeography, Population Dynamics, Sequence Analysis, Whales, Whales: genetics

  • Bowler D, Haase P, Kröncke I, Tackenberg O, Bauer H, Brendel C et al. (2015)

    A cross-taxon analysis of the impact of climate change on abundance trends in central Europe

    Biological Conservation 187 41-50.

    Advances in phenology and pole- and up-ward shifts in geographic ranges are well-documented signs that species are responding to climate change. A deeper understanding of such responses across ecologically different species groups will help to assess future consequences for entire ecosystems. A less well-studied pattern linked with climate change is increases in abundances of warm-adapted species compared with cold-adapted species. To compare how recent climate change has affected the abundances of species across different taxonomic groups, we analyzed long-term local population trends and related them to the species temperature niche, as inferred from geographic distributions. We used population data sets collected in different regions of Central Europe, primarily Germany, for bats, birds, butterflies, ground beetles, springtails and dry grassland plants. We found that temperature niche was positively associated with long-term population trends in some of the taxonomic groups (birds, butterflies, ground beetles) but was less important in others (bats, springtails, and grassland plants). This variation in the importance of temperature niche suggested that some populations have been affected more than others by climate change, which may be explained by differences in species attributes, such as generation time and microhabitat preference. Our findings indicate that relating temperature niches of species to population trends is a useful method to quantify the impact of climate change on local population abundances. We show that this widely applicable approach is particularly suited for comparative cross-system analyses to identify which types of organisms, in which habitats, are responding the most to climate change.

    Keywords: Comparative analysis, Environmental drivers, Population trends, Species traits, Thermal niche

  • Breusing C, Johnson S, Tunnicliffe V, Vrijenhoek R (2015)

    Population structure and connectivity in Indo-Pacific deep-sea mussels of the Bathymodiolus septemdierum complex

    Conservation Genetics 750.

    Current pressures to mine polymetallic sulfide deposits pose threats to the animal communities found at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Management plans aimed at preserving these unusual communities require knowledge of historical and contemporary forces that shaped the distri- butions and connectivity of associated species. As most vent research has focused on the eastern Pacific and mid-Atlantic ridge systems less is known about Indo-Pacific vents, where mineral extraction activities are imminent. Deep-sea mus- sels (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) of the genus Bathymodiolus include the morphotypic species B. septemdierum , B. brev- ior , B. marisindicus , and B. elongatus which are among the dominant vent taxa in western Pacific back-arc basins and the Central Indian Ridge. To assess their interpopulational relationships, we examined multilocus genotypes based on DNA sequences from four nuclear and four mitochondrial genes, and allozyme variation encoded by eleven genes. Bayesian assignment methods grouped mussels from seven widespread western Pacific localities into a single cluster, whereas the Indian Ocean mussels were clearly divergent. Thus, we designate two regional metapopulations. Notably, contemporary migration rates among all sites appeared to be low despite limited population differentiation, which high- lights the necessity of obtaining realistic data on recovery times and fine-scale population structure to develop and manage conservation units effectively. Future studies using population genomic methods to address these issues in a range of species will help to inform management plans aimed at mitigating potential impacts of deep-sea mining in the Indo-Pacific region

    Keywords: Allozymes, Bathymodiolus, Gene flow, Nuclear markers, mtDNA

  • Báez S, Malizia A, Carilla J, Blundo C, Aguilar M, Aguirre N et al. (2015)

    Large-scale patterns of turnover and Basal area change in Andean forests.

    PloS one 10(5) e0126594.

    General patterns of forest dynamics and productivity in the Andes Mountains are poorly characterized. Here we present the first large-scale study of Andean forest dynamics using a set of 63 permanent forest plots assembled over the past two decades. In the North-Central Andes tree turnover (mortality and recruitment) and tree growth declined with increasing elevation and decreasing temperature. In addition, basal area increased in Lower Montane Moist Forests but did not change in Higher Montane Humid Forests. However, at higher elevations the lack of net basal area change and excess of mortality over recruitment suggests negative environmental impacts. In North-Western Argentina, forest dynamics appear to be influenced by land use history in addition to environmental variation. Taken together, our results indicate that combinations of abiotic and biotic factors that vary across elevation gradients are important determinants of tree turnover and productivity in the Andes. More extensive and longer-term monitoring and analyses of forest dynamics in permanent plots will be necessary to understand how demographic processes and woody biomass are responding to changing environmental conditions along elevation gradients through this century.

    Keywords: Allozymes, Bathymodiolus, Gene flow, Nuclear markers, mtDNA

  • Chomicki G, Renner S (2015)

    Phylogenetics and molecular clocks reveal the repeated evolution of ant-plants after the late Miocene in Africa and the early Miocene in Australasia and the Neotropics.

    The New phytologist.

    Ant-plant symbioses involve over 110 ant species in five subfamilies that are facultative or obligate occupants of stem, leaf or root domatia formed by hundreds of ant-plant species. The phylogenetic distribution and geological ages of these associations, and the frequency of gains or losses of domatium, are largely unknown. We compiled an up-to-date list of ant domatium-bearing plants, estimated their probable true number from model-based statistical inference, generated dated phylogenies that include c. 50% of ant-plant lineages, and traced the occurrence of domatia and extrafloral nectaries on a 1181-species tree, using likelihood and Bayesian methods. We found 681 vascular plants with domatia (159 genera in 50 families) resulting from minimally 158 inferred domatium origins and 43 secondary losses over the last 19 Myr. The oldest African ant-plant symbioses are younger than those in Australasia and the Neotropics. The best statistical model suggests that the true number of myrmecophytes may approach 1140 species. The phylogenetic distribution of ant-plants shows that domatia evolved from a range of pre-adapted morphological structures and have been lost frequently, suggesting that domatia have no generalizable effect on diversification. The Miocene origin of ant-plant symbioses is consistent with inferred changes in diet and behaviour during ant evolution.

    Keywords: ant-plant symbioses, domatia, extrafloral nectaries (EFNs), mutualism, myrmecophytes, radiations, symbioses

  • F W (2015)

    Worldwide spread of Tetramorium caldarium (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    Myrmecol. News 21 93-99.

    Tetramorium caldarium (Roger, 1857) is a tramp ant species originally from Africa that has dispersed around the world through human commerce. From 1862 to 1979, T. caldarium was considered a junior synonym of T. simillimum (Smith, 1851). To document the worldwide spread of T. caldarium, we compiled > 300 published and unpublished specimen site records. In addition, in order to assess their species boundaries, we examined the type specimens of T. caldarium and T. simillimum. We documented Tetramorium caldarium records from 67 geographic areas (countries, island groups, major Caribbean islands, and Us states), including several for which there are no previously published records: Austral Islands, Australia, Benin, Cameroon, Cayman Islands, Congo (Republic), Curaçao, Dubai, El Salvador, Gabon, Guadeloupe, Indonesia, Jamaica, Martinique, Namibia, Panama, Scotland, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda. Tetramorium caldarium is truly cosmopolitan, with records spread across seven of the world's eight bioregions (all except the Antarctic, which has no ants). Tetramorium caldarium records are particularly common on Atlantic islands and from greenhouses and heated buildings in temperate Europe.

    Keywords: ant, ant research, ants, articles, behaviour, biogeography and faunistics, checklists, cognition and learning, community ecology, comparative morphology, conservation biology and bioindication, cytogenetics, ecology and evolution of symbioses, expert, formicid, formicidae, fragmentation ecology, hymenoptera, immune research, interspecific hybridisation, invasion biology, journal, manuscripts, methodology in community quantification, myrmecological, myrmecology, neurobiology, niche ecology, orientation and navigation, pdf, phenology, phylogeny and phylogeography, population genetics, research, science, scientific, scientific paper, sensory physiology, signal chemistry, social evolution, social parasitism, sociogenomics, stable isotopes, submission, subscription, taxonomy, taxonomy and systematics, tools for routine identification

  • Fandohan A, Oduor A, Sodé A, Wu L, Cuni-Sanchez A, Assédé E et al. (2015)

    Modeling vulnerability of protected areas to invasion by Chromolaena odorata under current and future climates

    Ecosystem Health and Sustainability 1(6) art20.

    Invasive plant species and climate change are among the biggest threats to the ecological integrity of many ecosystems, including those of protected areas. Effective management of invasive plants requires information regarding their spatial distributions. Using maximum entropy, we modeled habitat suitability for an invasive plant species Chromolaena odorata under current and future climatic conditions (HadGEM2-ES and MIROC5) in protected areas of four West African countries (Benin, Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana, and Togo). Under current climatic conditions, approximately 73% of total land area within the protected areas was suitable for colonization by C. odorata. Under future climate projections, the total area of suitable habitats for this invasive plant was projected to decrease by 7–9% (HadGEM2-ES) and 12–14% (MIROC5). Country-specific patterns suggest that major protected areas in Côte d'Ivoire and Ghana will be more vulnerable to invasion by C. odorata than those in Benin and Togo under both current and futu...

    Keywords: Chromolaena odorata, HadGEM2-ES, MIROC5, Siam weed, West Africa, climate change, maximum entropy, representative concentration pathways, risk assessment

  • Fernández M, Navarro L, Apaza-Quevedo A, Gallegos S, Marques A, Zambrana-Torrelio C et al. (2015)

    Challenges and opportunities for the Bolivian Biodiversity Observation Network

    Biodiversity 1-13.

    Pragmatic methods to assess the status of biodiversity at multiple scales are required to support conservation decision-making. At the intersection of several major biogeographic zones, Bolivia has extraordinary potential to develop a monitoring strategy aligned with the objectives of the Group on Earth Observations Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON). Bolivia, a GEO Observer since 2005, is already working on the adequacy of national earth observations towards the objectives of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). However, biodiversity is still an underrepresented component in this initiative. The integration of biodiversity into Bolivia’s GEO framework would confirm the need for a country level biodiversity monitoring strategy, fundamental to assess the progress towards the 2020 Aichi targets. Here we analyse and discuss two aspects of the process of developing such a strategy: (1) identification of taxonomic, temporal and spatial coverage of biodiversity data to detect both ava...

    Keywords: Bolivia, GEO BON, baseline, big data integration, biodiversity, monitoring

  • Feuda R, Bannikova A, Zemlemerova E, Di Febbraro M, Loy A, Hutterer R et al. (2015)

    Tracing the evolutionary history of the mole, Talpa europaea , through mitochondrial DNA phylogeography and species distribution modelling

    Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 114(3) 495-512.

    Our understanding of the effect of Pleistocene climatic changes on the biodiversity of European mammals mostly comes from phylogeographical studies of non-subterranean mammals, whereas the influence of glaciation cycles on subterranean mammals has received little attention. The lack of data raises the question of how and to what extent the current amount and distribution of genetic variation in subterranean mammals is the result of Pleistocene range contractions/expansions. The common mole (Talpa europaea) is a strictly subterranean mammal, widespread across Europe, and represents one of the best candidates for studying the influence of Quaternary climatic oscillation on subterranean mammals. Cytochrome b sequences, as obtained from a sampling covering the majority of the distribution area, were used to evaluate whether Pleistocene climate change influenced the evolution of T. europaea and left a trace in the genetic diversity comparable to that observed in non-subterranean small mammals. Subsequently, we investigated the occurrence of glacial refugia by comparing the results of phylogeographical analysis with species distribution modelling. We found three differentiated mitochondrial DNA lineages: two restricted to Spain and Italy and a third that was widespread across Europe. Phylogenetic inferences and the molecular clock suggest that the Spanish moles represent a highly divergent and ancient lineage, highlighting for the first time the paraphyly of T. europaea. Furthermore, our analyses suggest that the genetic break between the Italian and the European lineages predates the last glacial phase. Historical demography and spatial principal component analysis further suggest that the Last Glacial Maximum left a signature both in the Italian and in the European lineages. Genetic data combined with species distribution models support the presence of at least three putative glacial refugia in southern Europe (France, Balkan Peninsula and Black Sea) during thelast glacial maximum that likely contributed to post-glacial recolonization of Europe. By contrast, the Italian lineage remained trapped in the Italian peninsula and, according to the pattern observed in other subterranean mammals, did not contribute to the recolonization of northern latitudes

    Keywords: Europe, Last Glacial Maximum, SDM, cytochrome b, glacial refugia, historical demography, paraphyly, phylogenetics, sPCA