Uses of GBIF in scientific research

Peer-reviewed research citing GBIF as a data source, with at least one author from Czechia.
For all researches, please visit our "Peer-reviewed publications" page.

List of publications

  • Huber B, Huber B, Neumann J, Grabolle A, Hula V (2017)

    Aliens in Europe: updates on the distributions of Modisimus culicinus and Micropholcus fauroti (Araneae, Pholcidae)

    Arachnologische Mitteilungen 53 12-18.

    The pholcid spiders Modisimus culicinus (Simon, 1893) and Micropholcus fauroti (Simon, 1887) are pantropical species that have spread around the world at least several decades ago. Here we present numerous new records for both species, most of which fall into the expected latitudes, i.e. between the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn (93% and 87% of records respectively). However, we also report the first records for M. culicinus from Central Europe (Germany and Czech Republic, >50°N) and the first European record for M. fauroti from outside of Belgium (Germany). The fact that in both species several specimens have been found at more than one locality suggests that they may already be in the stage of establishment and spreading in Europe. Finally, we present an updated identification key to the genera of Pholcidae in Europe.

    Keywords: alien, harmless, invasive, pantropical, synanthropic


  • Liedtke H, Müller H, Hafner J, Penner J, Gower D, Mazuch T et al. (2017)

    Terrestrial reproduction as an adaptation to steep terrain in African toads

    Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 284(1851) 20162598.

    How evolutionary novelties evolve is a major question in evolutionary biology. It is widely accepted that changes in environmental conditions shift the position of selective optima, and advancements in phylogenetic comparative approaches allow the rigorous testing of such correlated transitions. A longstanding question in vertebrate biology has been the evolution of terrestrial life histories in amphibians and here, by investigating African bufonids, we test whether terrestrial modes of reproduction have evolved as adaptations to particular abiotic habitat parameters. We reconstruct and date the most complete species-level molecular phylogeny and estimate ancestral states for reproductive modes. By correlating continuous habitat measurements from remote sensing data and locality records with life-history transitions, we discover that terrestrial modes of reproduction, including viviparity evolved multiple times in this group, most often directly from fully aquatic modes. Terrestrial modes of reproduction are strongly correlated with steep terrain and low availability of accumulated water sources. Evolutionary transitions to terrestrial modes of reproduction occurred synchronously with or after transitions in habitat, and we, therefore, interpret terrestrial breeding as an adaptation to these abiotic conditions, rather than an exaptation that facilitated the colonization of montane habitats.

    Keywords: Bufonidae, amphibian, evolution, reproductive mode, terrestrial life history, viviparity


  • Pitteloud C, Arrigo N, Suchan T, Mastretta-Yanes A, Vila R, Dincă V et al. (2017)

    Climatic niche evolution is faster in sympatric than allopatric lineages of the butterfly genus Pyrgus

    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B: Biological Sciences 284(1852).

    Understanding how speciation relates to ecological divergence has long fascinated biologists. It is assumed that ecological divergence is essential to sympatric speciation, as a mechanism to avoid competition and eventually lead to reproductive isolation, while divergence in allopatry is not necessarily associated with niche differentiation. The impact of the spatial context of divergence on the evolutionary rates of abiotic dimensions of the ecological niche has rarely been explored for an entire clade. Here, we compare the magnitude of climatic niche shifts between sympatric versus allopatric divergence of lineages in butterflies. By combining next-generation sequencing, parametric biogeography and ecological niche analyses applied to a genus-wide phylogeny of Palaearctic Pyrgus butterflies, we compare evolutionary rates along eight climatic dimensions across sister lineages that diverged in large-scale sympatry versus allopatry. In order to examine the possible effects of the spatial scale at which sympatry is defined, we considered three sets of biogeographic assignments, ranging from narrow to broad definition. Our findings suggest higher rates of niche evolution along all climatic dimensions for sister lineages that diverge in sympatry, when using a narrow delineation of biogeographic areas. This result contrasts with significantly lower rates of climatic niche evolution found in cases of allopatric speciation, despite the biogeographic regions defined here being characterized by significantly different climates. Higher rates in allopatry are retrieved when biogeographic areas are too widely defined—in such a case allopatric events may be recorded as sympatric. Our results reveal the macro-evolutionary significance of abiotic niche differentiation involved in speciation processes within biogeographic regions, and illustrate the importance of the spatial scale chosen to define areas when applying parametric biogeographic analyses.

    Keywords: climatic niche, macro-evolutionary processes, next-generation sequencing, parametric biogeography


  • Taylor N, Kell S, Holubec V, Parra-Quijano M, Chobot K, Maxted N (2017)

    A systematic conservation strategy for crop wild relatives in the Czech Republic

    Diversity and Distributions 23(4) 448-462.

    Aim To create a crop wild relative (CWR) conservation strategy for the Czech Republic: the first national CWR conservation strategy for Central and Eastern Europe. Location Czech Republic. Methods We generated a CWR checklist for the Czech Republic and then prioritized taxa, using widely adopted criteria modified with input from local experts, to create a national CWR inventory. For 204 priority CWR species, we collated 206,760 presence records. We carried out spatial analyses to identify patterns in species richness, gaps in existing conservation actions, complementary conservation networks and collecting strategies to increase representativeness of gene bank accessions. We considered both specific and genetic conservation, using geographic and ecogeographic proxies for the latter. Results Passive in situ conservation of CWR in the Czech Republic is comprehensive at present, with all but one priority CWR species being contained in protected areas. Active in situ CWR conservation could be focussed within 11 ca. 10-km-by-10-km grid cells containing 94% of priority species, or their overlapping protected areas. To augment the genetic coverage of the in situ conservation network, active CWR conservation is encouraged within 11 supplementary areas. Meanwhile, there are huge gaps in ex situ collections, with no known conserved material for 134 of the 204 priority species. Furthermore, existing accessions are generally unrepresentative of genetic diversity. Main conclusions In the Czech Republic, active in situ conservation of priority CWR should be instigated within the 22 recommended grid cell areas or their 14 overlapping protected areas. For ex situ conservation, strategic and targeted collection of germplasm would markedly increase the value of gene bank collections. Diversity of priority Czech CWR is concentrated in South Moravia, making this a particularly important CWR area for the country and for Europe.

    Keywords: climatic niche, macro-evolutionary processes, next-generation sequencing, parametric biogeography


  • Dullinger I, Wessely J, Bossdorf O, Dawson W, Essl F, Gattringer A et al. (2016)

    Climate change will increase the naturalization risk from garden plants in Europe

    Global Ecology and Biogeography.

    Aim Plant invasions often follow initial introduction with a considerable delay. The current non-native flora of a region may hence contain species that are not yet naturalized but may become so in the future, especially if climate change lifts limitations on species spread. In Europe, non-native garden plants represent a huge pool of potential future invaders. Here, we evaluate the naturalization risk from this species pool and how it may change under a warmer climate. Location Europe. Methods We selected all species naturalized anywhere in the world but not yet in Europe from the set of non-native European garden plants. For this subset of 783 species, we used species distribution models to assess their potential European ranges under different scenarios of climate change. Moreover, we defined geographical hotspots of naturalization risk from those species by combining projections of climatic suitability with maps of the area available for ornamental plant cultivation. Results Under current climate, 165 species would already find suitable conditions in > 5% of Europe. Although climate change substantially increases the potential range of many species, there are also some that are predicted to lose climatically suitable area under a changing climate, particularly species native to boreal and Mediterranean biomes. Overall, hotspots of naturalization risk defined by climatic suitability alone, or by a combination of climatic suitability and appropriate land cover, are projected to increase by up to 102% or 64%, respectively. Main conclusions Our results suggest that the risk of naturalization of European garden plants will increase with warming climate, and thus it is very likely that the risk of negative impacts from invasion by these plants will also grow. It is therefore crucial to increase awareness of the possibility of biological invasions among horticulturalists, particularly in the face of a warming climate.

    Keywords: Alien species, horticulture, hotspot analysis, invasion debt, ornamental plants, species distribution model


  • Hrivnák R, Kochjarová J, Šumberová K, Schmotzer A (2016)

    Alien wetland annual Lindernia dubia (Scrophulariaceae): the first recently mentioned localities in Slovakia and their central European context

    Biologia 71(3) 281-286.

    Lindernia dubia (L.) Pennell, a Northern-American species, was recently found in two localities in central Slovakia (near Trenč and Štiavnické Bane villages) as a new species for the flora of Slovakia. Individuals of the species grew in wetland vegetation of the class Isoëto-Nano-Juncetea in both cases. The second mentioned locality probably belongs to the altitudinal maxima of L. dubia in Europe. Although the origin of L. dubia in the Slovak localities remains unknown, we suppose that zoochory or anthropochory are the most probable modes of its introduction into the territory of Slovakia.

    Keywords: Alien species, horticulture, hotspot analysis, invasion debt, ornamental plants, species distribution model


  • Jiménez-Alfaro B, García-Calvo L, García P, Acebes J (2016)

    Anticipating extinctions of glacial relict populations in mountain refugia

    Biological Conservation 201 243-251.

    Glacial relict populations at the rear-edge of species' distributions are expected to respond dramatically to climate warming, yet very few studies have compared their conservation status in current refugia. Here we combine population genetics with species distribution modelling to assess patterns and causes of extinction or persistence in two cold-adapted species, Salix hastata and Juncus balticus, which survived post-glacial retractions in calcareous fens of the Iberian Peninsula. In both species, we detected extremely-low genetic diversity and clonal strategies in red-listed populations of the most marginal region (Cantabrian Range), but high genetic diversity linked with sexual reproduction in populations from a less marginal region of the rear edge (Pyrenees). Genetic patterns were partially explained by past and present species´ climatic niches, more remarkably in the arctic-alpine S. hastata than in the boreo-atlantic J. balticus, suggesting different biogeographic history but similar sensitivity to global change. Our results show different magnitudes of extinction debt in regional populations that have survived in mountain refugia since the Last Glacial Maximum. Functional extinction of the most marginal populations can be explained by postglacial climate change and the historical decline of mire habitats. In contrast with the current trend of predicting future effects of climate change, we highlight that glacial relict populations might be currently going into extinction in climatically marginal regions. These populations can provide valuable information about the processes involved in species extinctions, improving our capacity to anticipate the effect of global change across regions and habitats.

    Keywords: Clonality, Extinction debt, Gadget timed out while loading, Genetic drift, Paleoclimate, Refugia, Relict populations


  • Mandakova T, Gloss A, Whiteman N, Lysak M (2016)

    How diploidization turned a tetraploid into a pseudotriploid

    American Journal of Botany ajb.1500452-.

    PREMISE OF THE STUDYDespite being highly fertile and occupying a large geographic region, the North American heartleaf bittercress (Cardamine cordifolia; Brassicaceae) has a puzzling triploid-like chromosome number (2n = 3x = 24). As most triploids are sterile, we embarked on a detailed analysis of the C. cordifolia genome to elucidate its origin and structure. METHODSMitotic and meiotic chromosome complement of C. cordifolia was analyzed by comparative chromosome painting using chromosome-specific BAC contigs of Arabidopsis thaliana. Resulting chromosome patterns were documented by multicolor fluorescence microscopy and compared with known ancestral and extant Brassicaceae genomes. KEY RESULTSWe discovered that C. cordifolia is not a triploid hybrid but a diploidized tetraploid with the prevalence of regular, diploid-like meiotic pairing. The ancestral tetraploid chromosome number (2n = 32) was reduced to a triploid-like number (2n = 24) through four terminal chromosome translocations. CONCLUSIONSThe structure of the pseudotriploid C. cordifolia genome results from a stepwise diploidization process after whole-genome duplication. We showed that translocation-based descending dysploidy (from n = 16 to n = 12) was mediated by the formation of five new chromosomes. The genome of C. cordifolia represents the diploidization process in statu nascendi and provides valuable insights into mechanisms of postpolyploidy rediploidization in land plants. Our data further suggest that chromosome number alone does not need to be a reliable proxy of species evolutionary past and that the same chromosome number may originate either by polyploidization (hybridization) or due to descending dysploidy.

    Keywords: Brassicaceae, centromere loss, chromosome fusion, chromosome translocation, diploidization, dysploidy, karyotype evolution, polyploidy, whole-genome duplication


  • Mikula O, Šumbera R, Aghová T, Mbau J, Katakweba A, Sabuni C et al. (2016)

    Evolutionary history and species diversity of African pouched mice (Rodentia: Nesomyidae: Saccostomus )

    Zoologica Scripta.

    We explore diversity of African pouched mice, genus Saccostomus (Rodentia, Nesomyidae), by sampling molecular and morphological variation across their continental-scale distribution in southern and eastern African savannahs and woodlands. Both mitochondrial (cytochrome b) and nuclear DNA (IRBP, RAG1) as well as skull morphology confirm the distinction between two recognized species, S. campestris and S. mearnsi, with disjunct distribution in the Zambezian and Somali–Maasai bioregions, respectively. Molecular dating suggests the divergence of these taxa occurred in the Early Pliocene, 3.9 Ma before present, whereas the deepest divergences within each of them are only as old as 2.0 Ma for S. mearnsi and 1.4 Ma for S. campestris. Based on cytochrome b phylogeny, we defined five clades (three within S. campestris, two in S. mearnsi) whose species status was considered in the light of nuclear DNA markers and morphology. We conclude that S. campestris group consists of two subspecies S. campestris campestris (Peters, 1846; comprising two cytochrome b clades) and S. campestris mashonae (de Winton, 1897) that are moderately differentiated, albeit distinct in IRBP and skull form. They likely hybridize to a limited extent along the Kafue–Zambezi Rivers. Saccostomus mearnsi group consists of two species, S. mearnsi (Heller, 1910) and S. umbriventer (Miller, 1910), that are markedly differentiated in both nuclear markers and skull form and may possibly co-occur in south-western Kenya and north-eastern Tanzania. Analysis of historical demography suggests both subspecies of S. campestris experienced population expansion dated to the Last Glacial. In the present range of S. campestris group, the distribution modelling suggests a moderate fragmentation of suitable habitats during the last glacial cycle, whereas in the range of S. mearnsi group it predicts substantial shifts of its occurrence in the same period.

    Keywords: Brassicaceae, centromere loss, chromosome fusion, chromosome translocation, diploidization, dysploidy, karyotype evolution, polyploidy, whole-genome duplication


  • Oberlander K, Dreyer L, Goldblatt P, Suda J, Linder H (2016)

    Species-rich and polyploid-poor: Insights into the evolutionary role of whole-genome duplication from the Cape flora biodiversity hotspot

    American Journal of Botany 103(7) 1336-1347.

    PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Whole-genome duplication (WGD) in angiosperms has been hypothesized to be advantageous in unstable environments and/or to increase diversification rates, leading to radiations. Under the first hypothesis, floras in stable environments are predicted to have lower proportions of polyploids than highly, recently disturbed floras, whereas species-rich floras would be expected to have higher than expected proportions of polyploids under the second. The South African Cape flora is used to discriminate between these two hypotheses because it features a hyperdiverse flora predominantly generated by a limited number of radiations (Cape clades), against a backdrop of climatic and geological stability. METHODS: We compiled all known chromosome counts for species in 21 clades present in the Cape (1653 species, including 24 Cape clades), inferred ploidy levels for these species by inspection or derived from the primary literature, and compared Cape to non-Cape ploidy levels in these clades (17,520 species) using G tests. KEY RESULTS: The Cape flora has anomalously low proportions of polyploids compared with global levels. This pattern is consistently observed across nearly half the clades and across global latitudinal gradients, although individual lineages seem to be following different paths to low levels of WGD and to differing degrees. CONCLUSIONS: This pattern shows that the diversity of the Cape flora is the outcome of primarily diploid radiations and supports the hypothesis that WGD may be rare in stable environments.

    Keywords: Cape flora, diversification, environmental stability, evolutionary radiation, polyploidy, whole-genome duplication