News items tagged with Australia

  • News item

    GBIF Spain launches new national data portal

    GBIF Spain released its new national biodiversity data portal on Friday, November 28, at an event at Real Jardín Botánico-CSIC in Madrid. The new site—http://datos.gbif.es—provides free access to more than 10 million biodiversity records from 69 Spanish institutions and projects as well as nearly another million records of biodiversity in Spain published by institutions abroad.

    The new GBIF Spain site builds on an open-source system originally developed by the Atlas of Living Australia (ALA), and represents the first of several results expected from this year’s collaborations across the GBIF network.

    In February, the GBIF Secretariat and ALA invited external review of ALA’s highly refined and successful web application to evaluate whether its streamlined and repackaged core could be adopted to establish other biodiversity data portals. The effort to simplify, share and reuse this technology aimed to reduce development costs for GBIF’s nodes and expand capacity across the network through technology transfer and knowledge exchange.

    In June, the ALA team issued an open invitation to developers to participate in a technical workshop in Canberra. The July workshop hosted 10 visitors representing not only GBIF Spain and the Secretariat, but also GBIF Argentina, GBIF France, INBio (host of GBIF’s Costa Rican node), the Forest Research Institute Malaysia and São Paulo University. Attendees gained skills in installing and using the ALA tools and kicked off collaborative development efforts geared toward increasing its functionality in line with needs expressed by the workshop participants.

    The new GBIF Spain website enables its users to filter, access, visualize and download data from research institutes, universities, public administrations and NGOs from all over country. It also provides detailed information for each dataset, facilitates custom taxonomic, geographic, temporal and other searches. Designed to support linking and reuse by external databases, the new site customized the ALA code base to serve Spanish-language users. GBIF Spain has contributed these localized customizations back to the open-source project.

    GBIF Spain is sponsored by the Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, which commissioned the management of national activities in GBIF to the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC—Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas). In addition to the support and participation of Spain’s dozens of data publishers, the IFCA (Instituto de Física de Cantabria) was essential to the creation of the new site.

    3 weeks ago


  • News item

    CSIRO’s Tony Rees named 2014 Ebbe Nielsen Prize winner

    GBIF has awarded its prestigious Ebbe Nielsen Prize for 2014 to Tony Rees, whose groundbreaking informatics tools have significantly advanced the delivery of data about life on Earth.

    2 months ago


  • News item

    How plants weather the cold

    Research published in Nature journal has used GBIF-mediated data on nearly 30,000 species to investigate how plants evolved strategies to survive in cold climates.

    2 months ago


  • News item

    So many fish, one great map – ALA launches FishMap

    Australia’s marine fish species are now at your fingertips thanks to FishMap, launched by the Atlas of Living Australia (ALA), the GBIF node in the country.

    2 months ago


  • Featured data use

    Animal burrows are climate change refuges

    A study using museum records accessed via GBIF highlights the importance of 'ecosystem engineers' in providing places of refuge in a warming climate.

    1 year ago


  • Featured data use

    Adapting agriculture to future climate: the date palm

    Climate change will make many parts of North Africa unsuitable for growing date palms, according to research using occurrence data accessed via GBIF to generate models based on future conditions of temperature and moisture.

    1 year ago


  • Featured data use

    GBIF enables global study of climate impact on species

    Research published in Nature Climate Change uses records on nearly 50,000 species accessed through GBIF to forecast major reductions in the climate ranges of common plants and animals around the world.

    1 year ago